Finding an Invention Partner

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I don’t know about you, but as a creative I have always thought it would be great to have a partner to work on ideas with. The only problem is finding the right person to work with.

I have tried partnering up on ideas which was fun and a friend even recently asked me to do the same thing. The trouble is our skills don’t really complement one another – we both like doing the same bits of the process. We like the ideas, the design, but neither of us are good at the selling part.

Have you experienced the same thing?

I emailed Andrew Krauss, from InventRight to ask him if he would consider adding a section to the Inventright forum for finding an invention partner and he emailed me back with his advice.

His advice was good and I suggested he should make it into a blog post, he said he was thinking the same thing.

In the blog post he talks about finding someone with different skills to yourself and also about how to test a potential invention partner before you work with them.

You can find Andrew’s full advice for finding an invention partner here http://inventornotes.com/2012/10/20/inventor-partnerships-sweet-dream-or-nightmare/

PS. Ideas person, with graphic design skills SEEKS ideas person with strong sales skills and tons of focus for invention partnership.

Stephen Key Invention Licensing Seminar in Belfast November 13th 2012

Stephen Key InventorStephen Key, inventor and author of One Simple Idea will be part of a Licensing Seminar to be held in Belfast on Tuesday 13th November

Cost £50 +VAT (which includes lunch and a copy of Stephen’s Book).

If you want to learn more about licensing your ideas you can find out more at:

http://www.eventfulreg.com/index.php/investni/stephen-key

Stephen Key Licensing Seminar

Tuesday 13 November 2012, 09:00 → 17:00
Riddel Hall, Stranmillis Road, Belfast

New Book One Simple Idea for Startups and Entrepreneurs by Stephen Key Coming Soon

One Simple Idea by Stephen KeyIf you have read my blog before you may be aware that I am a big fan of Stephen Key’s method of licensing ideas without spending much money. Stephen Key’s previous book “One Simple Idea” is one of my favourites on invention and licensing so I was excited when Stephen emailed me to say he has a new book coming out soon. This time still called “One Simple Idea” but aimed at “Startups and Entrepreneurs“. The book will be out on November 5th from Amazon and Barnes and Noble and I am very keen to get reading. Stephen has also volunteered to do a Skype interview when I have read the book.

You also can get special bonuses ordering the book through the Inventright website

One Simple Idea for Startups and Entrepreneurs

A brief Synopsis from One Simple Idea for Startups and Entrepreneurs from the notes Stephen sent me

One Simple Idea for Startups and Entrepreneurs, helps people understand how to kick fear to the curb and start a business. There are four major things to do to be able to make a dream become a reality.

Keep it simple

If you focus on simple ideas, it can help you face your fear and overcome anxiety. It isn’t necessary to reinvent the wheel to start a business.

Ways of testing an idea

It may seem like a huge undertaking to try and test a simple product, but there are easy ways to do this to help shove the anxiety of starting a business aside.

How to plan

The best way to plan your business is to do the math. The bottom line is, at the end of the day, can you put money in your pocket?

Keeping it going

This is one of the most daunting things to consider when starting a small business.

Everybody has an idea. The idea of starting a business is frightening, but these things helped me understand how to take away the risk, and find the courage to jump off the ledge.

Interview with Bryce Taylor who Invented the Halo Trainer

Bruce Inventor of Halo TrainerIn this inventor interview Bryce Taylor tells the story of how he invented and developed the Halo Trainer, a piece of exercise equipment that can fit over a stability exercise ball to create hundreds of exercise options.

Tara: What is your name, invention name and website URL?

Bryce: Bryce Taylor, Halo Trainer, halotrainer.com

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Bryce: Practicing physical therapist in Indianapolis, outpatient ortho/sports medicine background, part time athlete, and former personal trainer, always wanted to invent since middle school. I’ve had many ideas along the way such as swiveling car seats to improve transfer into the car for aging adults or disabled. I have never sought funding for intellectual property until this recent project.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Bryce: I was creating new core stabiization methods with the stability ball and realized that it needed handles to control the ball better. The Halo Trainer is an ergonomic friction-fitting apparatus that fits over a stablity ball to create hundreds of new or modified exercises to help people improve core strength and flexibility.

Halo Trainer Fitness equipment invention

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Bryce: I couldn’t stop thinking of the idea of handlebars for a stability ball once the idea came to mind. I then took my idea to a local manufacturer to discuss next steps.

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

Bryce: The inital drawings were nothing like the final product. The concept was molded in my mind and finally it required wire to create a 3-D representation of the prototype. The wire was then replicated by bending soft copper tubing in real size. From that copper tubing prototype, a CAD drawing was constructed by a word-of-mouth referral.

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Bryce: I immediately sought legal council to protect the idea. I hired a local firm and discussed the idea with a patent attorney. Later came trademark protection.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFR3O985RWI

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Bryce: I initially thought licensing the idea would be best for my lifestyle and family but then took it on with the expectation that this can grow slowly with low pressure. That’s not realistic by the way!

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

Bryce: I had a referral for a manufacturer. Investors were needed for the project to get to market. I found people were asking to invest because they liked the product so much.

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

Bryce: I haven’t found the best way yet. It takes a lot of time and money to promote a product. I have built a website that is currently being redeveloped and optimized.  I feel that the internet is where many curious onlookers will stumble upon my product but the site just hasn’t been optimal for attracting new clients.  I have attended a couple industry tradeshows where the networking has been great but the return on the investment isn’t always quite there.  I am considering online sales promotions through social media.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

Bryce: Manufacturing mishaps. The product design and development went so smoothly until conversion to mass manufacturing.  We had to decline the first imported container because the product was not to the same standards as the previous reviewed samples.  It’s all fixed now though.

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Bryce: 2.5 years

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Bryce: Absolutely!  There are too many to list here.  Let’s just say that we grow wiser with years.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Bryce: First consider if there is a true need for the invention in the marketplace, determine the target market, and ask many questions.

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

Bryce: www.halotrainer.com

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Interview with Inventor Ginny Scales-Medeiros about her Self Tanning System Invention

Ginny Scales-Medeiro InventorIn this inventor interview Ginny Scales-Medeiros talks about how she came up with the idea for her Flawless Self Tanning Invention and how she developed it, got it to market and publicised it.

Tara: Your name, invention name and website URL?

Ginny: Ginny Scales-Medeiros Flawless Selftanning System www.ginnyscalesmedeiros.com

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Ginny: I am located in the SanFrancisco Northbay, Santa Rosa I have had dreams about inventions my whole life and talk about it in my New Novel “What is Normal?” www.whatisnormal.tv I have no experiance in this field and Eli Whitney the inventor of the cotton gin, had no prior experience with the cotton industry. We are visionarys

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Ginny: Knowing the dangers of too much sun or cancer causing tanning beds. Sunless tanning is the best option,yet there are down sides. I bought clear sunless tanning products that you couldn’t see while applying them and ended up with streaks.I also bought the sunless products with dyes and bronzers that showed where she was applying them, but were messy and the dyes stained my sheets and clothes. I knew there was a market out there for sunless tanning products and had seen for myself the flaws in what was presently available, which made me determined to create a sunless tanning product that was flawless.

I spent hours and hours on the computer learning about different ingredients, different light responsive compounds and how to get My idea patented. I had got my idea while at Disneyland. When entering the park, they stamped my hand and the hands of my children. Right there, I had a light bulb moment. I thought why not take the ingredient in all sunless tanning products, dihydroxyacetone, that is invisible when applying it and add a light responsive ingredient that shows up under a special light. You could then see where you were applying your sunless product under the hand held light. If you missed a spot, you could fix it. No need for any added messy dyes or bronzers.

Self Tanning Invention

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Ginny: I started mixing formulations in my Kitchen. I entered contests with it and Won 1st place in a national Woman’s magazine “New Woman Magazine”

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

Ginny: I mixed standard store bought sunless tanners with Light responsive ingredients. If you take a black light into your bathroom you will see many products contain Light responsive ingredients that you already put on your skin.

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Ginny: I hired a Patent Trademark lawyer. 1st International patent search. 2nd apply for patent.

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Ginny: I started manufacturing with a boutique manufacturer. It cost more money but the assistance I got from them was valuable starting out.

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

Ginny: I looked for someone in suncare and making quality products.

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

Ginny: I contacted editors from top magazines and was featured in Elle, Fitness, Shape, Health, on ABC,NBC, and knocked on the doors of World Class Spa resorts like The Canyon Ranch. I also pitched QVC my self and got to sell it on air myself too.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

Ginny: The most difficult elements for me were the nay sayers. I do have a personality that enjoys the win of proving I can… Thank God Literally and figuratively!

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Ginny: I started my research in 1994 and was awarded my 1st patent in 1997. I started manufacturing it while it was patent pending (understand you have more protection while your patent is pending, because no one knows what you have until it is public) about 3 yrs to get to market.

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Ginny: Yes, I would have stuck with building a foundation in one area and grow from there.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Ginny: 1st you know if you have a real invention if  you can NOT stop thinking about it, until its manifested. Mke sure you have done a comprehensive International Patent search before anything else and is there a market for it?

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

Ginny: You may google Ginny Flawless self tanning or go to http://whatisnormal.tv/ginny/invention/ click on the Press and Spa page too this part of my journey is included in my new Novel “What is Normal?” and I am also a free Agent with my Registerd Trademark & Patents up for license

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com