Learn to Create a Startup Business or Product – Free and Cheap Online Classes

I just wanted to let you know about a few free and inexpensive classes which might be of interest to anyone wanting to start a business or create a product on a shoestring budget. I am not sure how long the free courses with remain free, so sign up if you are interested quickly (I have).

Running Lean: Raise Your Odds of Building a Successful Product – Free

lean start up class

“The class is designed for entrepreneurs/intrapreneurs looking to launch a startup idea or bring a new product to market. It will show you how to get starting by first capturing your initial vision (or Plan A) and then how to bullet-proof this vision and begin the process of stress-testing your business model.”

Find out more about the free class and enrol on Skillshare.com

Minimum Viable Product: Launch Your Startup Idea for Less than $1,000 – Free

This class is taught by the creator of Skillshare

Minimum viable product skillshare class

“Clearly communicate your startup idea in one sentence Identify the holes in your startup idea and the top 2-3 solutions to plug them Create an action plan with your first five (5) action steps towards validating your startup idea for less than $1,000 Choose one key metric you’ll use to measure success”

Find out more about the free class and enrol on Skillshare.com

Start a profitable business without needing a tech co-founder – $25 (but save $10 with my link below)

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BwbtSPQ8jAY

This class is taught by Noah Kagon who has worked for Mint, Facebook and now owns Appsumo. He has ery simple ways of testing ideas.

“What you’ll learn in this course: How to validate your business ideas and determine if its worth pursuing and  how to find your first customer”

Find out more about the free class and enrol on Skillshare.com (please note this link gets you a discount of $10 and I will also get a $10 credit)

Manufacturing: Design, Source and Manufacture Your Product Idea – $25 (but save $10 with my link below)

product development and manufacture

I have no experience of this class,  but it looks like it could be useful for anyone wanting to get a product manufactured

“You’ll finish knowing how to design, source, and manufacture your product in a step-by-step process. You’ll learn basic manufacturing “speak”, prepare for “sticky spots” like vetting factories and ensuring quality control, and hear from a range of guest experts in this field. You’ll also have access to Vendor and Supplier referrals from myself and my team. You’ll walk away with your very own Production Plan that you can use to take your idea from concept to finished product.”

Find out more about the free class and enrol on Skillshare.com (please note this link gets you a discount of $10 and I will also get a $10 credit)

 

 

 

Interview with Adrian Hayward Inventor of Pick Tack for Guitar Players

An inventor interview with Adrian Hayward, who invented the Pick Tack – a guitarist pick holder with a twist. Make sure you check out his Kickstarter Campaign

Pick Tack Inventor

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Adrian: I am currently living in Minehead, Somerset UK and I conceived my first invention at 12 years old. I sought advice from a few people and even went to a business advisor a while later, but didn’t have the tools to proceed. A few years later I saw that my idea was on the market but someone else had got there first! I was gutted that I hadn’t been able to do anything with it but it gave me confidence that my idea had been a winner.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

pick tack diagramAdrian: Pick Tack is a simple pick holder with a twist. As well as storing 3 picks, like many conventional holders, it has a putty pad that enables you to stick and retrieve your plectrum quickly and easily when you’re playing. Many people seem to invent by problem-solving. I have always found the ideas come to me without any obvious thought process, effort or build up. That may not seem like helpful information but I have found that my best ideas come when I get out of the way of them and allow them to surface.

The idea of Pick Tack came in the way I’ve just described: I have been playing guitar for over 25 years. My unique playing style requires that I constantly change between pick and finger methods.

When I invented Pick Tack, I was performing professionally around my area of the South West and I found that I was always mislaying my pick between songs or sets. I would balance it on the music stand, balance it on the guitar or even hold it between my teeth. The last option, although more effective than the other two, only worked if I wasn’t singing. I’ve seen many guitarists struggle with this same issue.

After looking at the problems and solutions from many different angles, I came up with a solution that solved all of my requirements and Pick Tack was born, or at least I had found a substance that solved the problem. It would be a while before it became Pick Tack as it is today.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTA1VZvW_8M

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Adrian: From the age of about 14 until late 2012 (22 years later), I had all but forgotten about inventing. Initially, the idea was purely a personal solution and it didn’t dawn on me that it was a marketable idea.

At that point I had been trying various kinds of self-employed work because I knew I didn’t want a regular job. I had very little work coming in and wasn’t satisfied with any that I did have. I was spending every day on the internet looking for jobs and work-at-home opportunities. An idea came to me to look up courses on inventing and I came across InventRight and looked into what they had to offer. It only took me a few hours to realise that their course was exactly what I needed so I scraped the money together for the first instalment and signed up.

With the InventRight course you get personal mentoring from one of the two co-founders and I soon had my first Skype call with my mentor. I discussed some of the ideas that I had and he advised that I go for something simple to start off with. I chose what would later become known as Pick Tack and began to work through the 10 steps laid out in the course.

pick tack invention for guitars

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

Adrian: I was invited to a wedding and on the way up, my friend asked me what I’d been up to. I told them about the course and shared a couple of my ideas with them. They informed me that I would be sharing a room where we were staying with a guy who was a 3D designer. That night, we stayed up for hours discussing my ideas and he said he’d be up for helping to design what was still just a concept in my mind. After a few weeks we had 3 designs and I had picked one to use as the centrepiece for a sell sheet to give to companies to promote my idea. Using the CAD file, the designer was able to create a rough prototype so we could shoot a video for promotion.

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Adrian: My mentor advised me to patent the idea just before approaching companies. I had decided I would go for the US market, partly because InventRight is based there and so I thought I’d take advantage of the expertise and having an avenue in. This meant I was able to utilise their provisional patent option, which allows you to file a claim in plain English rather than legal speak. I used a book called Patent Pending in 24 hours by Richard Stim, Attorney. It gave me all the info I needed to put together a document that I was confident had covered all the necessary information and requirements.

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Adrian: InventRight is setup to help people take their idea to market through licensing to companies, so that was always my intention. I was looking for a way to free me up to concentrate on my music career without the music bearing all the pressure of providing my entire income. I had been approaching manufacturers for a few months in the music industry and had been finding it hard to even get to the right people. I had some encouraging responses from some very reputable companies, but none that wanted to include Pick Tack in their retail line.

I came to a point where I felt that I needed to consider other ways of taking Pick Tack to market. I got in touch with an old contact who has been a successful entrepreneur for many years. He got back to me within a few hours and we talked things through, and as a result I decided to venture Pick Tack as a business. From then on, the whole dynamic changed for the better.

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

Adrian: My friend, who I just referred to, is already connected with a manufacturer that he has used for a while so I was able to make use of an already existing arrangement. We decided it would be a great idea to launch the project on Kickstarter and it has just gone live today at the time of writing. Kickstarter is an amazing platform for raising the initial capital needed to get things off the ground. It also proves that there is a market for whatever you’re funding and helps to create a fan base. I have put some of my own money in as well but have tried to keep that to a minimum, as nothing is guaranteed when it comes to business. It is possible to keep running costs very low if you are resourceful and it doesn’t mean you have to compromise on quality.

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

Adrian: As I’ve just mentioned, Kickstarter is an amazing place to host your product and has a great following, but this on its own is not enough. You need to find a way to get people to the site to look at it. The number one way I have chosen to promote is through social media, especially Facebook. I made a list of relevant people that I thought would be interested in Pick Tack or willing to help spread the word. I then contacted them all one by one to tell them about the launch. This way I hoped it would have a personal feel, rather than just me spamming them to get likes or money.

I will be contacting bloggers and music publications as well, to try and widen my reach but these are secondary methods.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

Adrian: Although Pick Tack has not made it to market yet, there have been some difficult obstacles to overcome so far. When you work with others, you are often restricted to their timetables and ways of doing things. I am referring to the big companies that I approached over the last few months. They take their time about everything and they have their way of doing things. This can be very frustrating when you want to move things along.

I have struggled a great deal with maintaining belief and enthusiasm in what I’m doing during the long period of waiting for ‘a break’. I think time can be one of the biggest killers of dreams!

The most difficult obstacle for me to overcome was one that I believe nearly everybody faces who has not been taught the best ways to take something from concept to market. It is not a science but a learning experience and I cannot imagine that I would be where I am without input from people who have already been down the kind of paths I’m now taking. The biggest help for me along the way has been a course that guides you through proven steps to take and a mentor who has the experience to navigate through the twists and turns that are brand new to me but that he’s seen many times before. I can’t recommend enough finding someone who can help in this way!

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Adrian: From the point of conception until now and reaching Kickstarter, it has been about 10 months and providing the Kickstarter project is successful, it should only be about 2 or 3 more to market. I have loved nearly every minute of it and don’t really view it as ‘work’, although I have worked incredibly hard throughout this time on this and other projects, some days working as much as 18 hours. I mention this because I always believed that business ventures were the easy way out and I never believed the veterans when they said how hard it can be. I genuinely thought that my journey would be different but it has been long and hard (as well as incredibly enjoyable).

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Adrian: As I have said, I had a proven method to follow so that eliminated a lot of the mistakes I would have otherwise encountered. The only thing that I would probably do differently is to spend less time trying to perfect everything. It’s in my nature to do so, as with a lot of inventors, but it doesn’t make enough of a difference to warrant the time it takes.
I have ended up venturing the idea, so have been able to retain a lot of the ideas I came up with. If I had ended up licensing, it it’s possible that the manufacturer would have changed a great deal of stuff I’d agonised over. Not only would this have wasted some precious time but it would have been harder in the long run to let go of control when it came to a licensing deal.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Adrian: Don’t give up. You never know when a breakthrough’s going to come. Actually, it often seems to come just after you had the chance to give up but didn’t take it. Find a mentor or anyone wiser who is further along the journey than yourself. Learn how to learn. The internet is full of amazing advice but there’s so much of it and at first you have no way of measuring its accuracy or validity. The more you learn, the more efficient you become and the faster you can find out what you need to know. Create space to be creative and learn to feed yourself with the best ideas and information for you, so that inventing is just a natural by-product.

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

The best place at the moment is the Kickstarter site. It has everything anyone could want to know about the story behind the idea, the benefits it brings and the way to get one if you want one.

Facebook Page – https://www.facebook.com/PickTackClassic, Twitter – https://twitter.com/PickTack

 

 

 

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Free Online Course to Learn to Develop Innovative Ideas for New Companies

I just found out about a new FREE online course which is supposed to teach you how to develop new ideas

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LEJZdizgP1k

From the website:

“Explore how to identify and develop great ideas into great companies. Learn how to identify opportunities based on real customer needs. Develop solid business models. Create successful companies.”

The course is self paced but starts May 20th 2013 (6 weeks long)

find out more at www.coursera.org

Found via: Inventors Society of Florida Newsletter

 

Interview with George Wood the Inventor of FREEZE N GO

George Inventor Freeze N GoIn this inventor interview George Wood explains how he took a problem that was bothering him, (not being able to keep a drink cool at night) and created his FREEZE N GO invention to solve it.

Tara: What is your name, invention name and website URL?

George: George Wood, FREEZE N GO freezengo.com

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

George: I’m located in Jensen Beach, Florida. My background is in sales, 25 years in the hardware industry and 10 in ceramic/porcelain flooring distribution.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

George: It is a personal beverage cooler that when frozen, will keep your beverage cold for over 12 hours indoors. For over 40 years I have gone to bed with a cold drink only to wake up in the middle of the night and it was warm, no way to keep it cold. When I was cleaning out the freezer one day, I accidently left a freeze gel pack on the counter overnight. When I went to move it the next day, it was still cold. I went to Walmarts and purchased four additional but smaller freeze gel packs. I then went home and duct taped them together around a bottle of water. I then put the duct taped freeze gel packs in the freezer overnight. The next day, I removed the unit and put a bottle of water in it and a thermometer in the bottle of water, it stayed at 38 degrees all day long, thus the FREEZE N GO was born. I used it for a week next to my bed, it worked great but needed something to insulate and reduce the condensation. I ended up making a 5mm neoprene sleeve to wrap around the FREEZE N GO to insulate and reduce condensation. The insulation sleeve also makes a great “billboard” to advertise on.

Invention prototype

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

George: After using the duct taped unit for a week and liking it so well, I proceeded in making a smaller unit out of cardboard to see what it would look like. I then researched it on the Internet to see if there was anything like it on the market. Not finding anything, a patent attorney was hired to do a patent search. The search came back clear in about six weeks, I then applied for a utility patent which was granted in less than 120 days.

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

George: After receiving the patent, I contacted a plastic injection manufacturer with my cardboard prototype to design it in detail on their 3-d cad computer. After being satisfied with the final design, a plastic injection mold was made to produce the FREEZE N GO.

Keep drinks cold invention

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

George: As stated, the FREEZE N GO is patented and trademarked.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5orQhPqobyE

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

George: Didn’t really want to get involved with the manufacturing of it but had to see if it actually worked as intended. Now that we know that it works, would love an opportunity to license it to an existing manufacturer that can market it throughout the world. Because of the “Mass Appeal” the FREEZE N GO has, I have had request for distribution from France, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Belgium, Brazil, Turkey, Mexico and Russia. In fact, Russia did a story on the FREEZE N GO in their publication titled “Top 1000 Marketing Ideas of the World”.

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

George: I knew that there would be a number of issues to be resolved during the manufacturing process. If it was made in China, I would not have been able to be involved in correcting the issues we were presented with. I wanted a manufacturer that was located close to resolve issues as they came up. I probably took over thirty trips (twenty miles away) to my selected manufacturer to resolve various issues. A majority of the funding came from a personal friend and former employer.

NOTE: For years we have gone to Las Vegas yearly to have a good time. I always complained while in the hotel room that I could not keep my drink cold all night. I told him if I could ever invent something that could, I’d be rich. Well I invented it, but sure haven’t gotten rich yet!!!!

Freeze N Go Invention advert

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

George: The best way would be television and the most expensive. Social media including Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter and YouTube would be good if I would learn more about it. I’m currently selling the FREEZE N GO’s on my web site at www.freezengo.com, Jamin’ Jensen, a street type table top shin dig in my home town of Jensen Beach on Thursday nights, a couple local golf courses, local Ace Hardware Stores and word of mouth. Approximately 2,000 have been sold since production.

Probably the best way to promote and market the FREEZE N GO is with the insulation sleeve that comes with it. The sleeve makes an excellent four sided “Billboard” to promote or license a wide range of businesses, schools. Hotels, restaurants, fund raisers and casinos to name a few. In fact, we have a pending order for 1800 units from a casino located in Washington State and a watch maker located in Miami for a promotion this summer.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

George: I would have to say the issues we have had with the plastic cracking after multiple freeze thaw cycles. We ended up using a resin instead of a plastic, a more expensive product.

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

George: It took a little over two years, nearly eight months to get the mold made and delivered.

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

George: Several things, would design a multiple mold to produce two or four units at a time and automate filling and sealing via sonic weld.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

George: Don’t give up and make sure that you have the financial resources to reach your goal.

 Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

George:  www.freezengo.com, FREEZENGO Facebook and a number of articles on the Internet.

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Inventor Portraits – Video Inventor Interviews

If you have read this blog before you may well know that it features inventor interviews – now about 100 in total. I came across another blog that has inventor interview that I thought might interest you. These video interviews are beautifully shot, they look like something you would see on TV. You can check them out at http://www.davidfriedmanphoto.com/blog/inventors/ or watch a few of them below.

Inventor Portrait: Steven Sasson

Inventor Portrait: Ralph Baer

Inventor Portrait: Tami Galt

http://www.davidfriedmanphoto.com/blog/inventors/

Inventor Lucy Mitchell talks about her Invention the MagneClip®

Lucy A Mitchell Inventor of MagneClip Dog Leash ClipIn this inventor interview Lucy A Mitchell shares her story of bringing her invention MagneClip® to market. MagneClip® is a new snap hook (used on things like dog leashes) which use a magnet rather than a conventional spring. Lucy currently has a crowdfunding campaign to help raise money for her product at http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/magneclip-magnetic-snaphook/x/1704284

Tara: What is your name, invention name and website URL?

Lucy: Lucy A Mitchell, my invention the MagneClip® www.magneclip.com

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Lucy: I live in Wiltshire UK. I moved back to the UK after living in Florida USA for 20 years. I originally went to Florida to do some flight training and to become a pilot. I ended up staying after teaching others to fly to build up my flight experience.

I think I have always like to design different things. I remember as a child being annoyed at things that didn’t work properly, or being unable to find good information.

I don’t have an engineering degree, but certainly having a good understanding of how and why things work is a blessing. I’m certainly glad I insisted in studying engineering drawing at school even though girls weren’t allowed to take the subject and were supposed to do typing. That would have been useful too. But those were the days before everyone had computers and I had never typed anything in my life.

I studied various practical subjects when I was training to become a pilot and physics, chemistry and mathematics at school were so important. I also used to help fix engines and motorbikes and cars as a teenager.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Lucy: The MagneClip® Ease is a snap hook. Just like the ones used on dog leashes and backpacks. But instead of using a spring like every other snap hook I used a magnet instead.

I came up with the idea after I was at a pet tradeshow in 2010 in Germany. I was talking to a vendor and playing with one of his leashes. It slide bolt snapped back and the button flipped my thumbnail off the nail bed and tore my nail. Painful and I needed to go and get it repaired.

The big difference with springs and magnets are their force and how that force is applied. If you look at my video of the bow and arrow you can see how a spring works. It has little or no force when it is at rest. Just like a spring snap hook. This means the slide bolt can start to rattle when it gets old. It is also very easy to open very slightly. But as you try to open it further it becomes progressively harder. When the slide bolt is fully open it is like the bow and arrow. Ready to shoot if your thumb slips. The small knob on the slide bolt is what hurts. It catches your nail, knuckle or even your dog and hits it full force.

A magnet works the opposite. It has full force when it is closed. So it wants to stay closed. But as you open it magnets quickly lose most of their attraction when they are only a millimeter or two apart. That means when it is fully open you don’t have to struggle keeping it open and if you let go by accident it cannot build up any momentum so it closes gently. You just get a click over the last millimeter and that is too small to injure any part of your body.

As the MagneClip® Ease opens inwards it means you don’t have to bend your thumb at the joints. That is very good for anyone with arthritis, or women that just have smaller less powerful hands than men do. You simply apply pressure at the opening and it clicks on.

I could bore everyone for an hour explaining exactly how and why it works. But when you use it you can instantly tell the difference. It may look almost the same but until you get it in your hands you won’t really get it.

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Lucy: After I came up with the idea, I first did some rough drawings. Very rough. When I look at them now I smile as they are pretty ragged. I sent them to an engineering design company I had worked with in the past for their input. They responded with a yes it will work and what an interesting idea. They made up a prototype on a 3D printer and sent me the sample and drawings. I sent them to my attorney to do a patent search.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MKTr7yF_pYs

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Lucy: To my amazement there was nothing similar. So I filed a utility patent. Then came the hard part, trying to find a manufacturer.

Magneclip dog leash collar connector

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Lucy: I attended another trade show and spoke quietly to several companies. They had all said that the snap hooks were a problem. I had them sign a NDA (non disclosure agreement) and then showed them my new still unnamed snap hook. Most of the vendors liked it. The market is targeted towards women as about 80% of buyers are female. So most vendors ‘got it’ .The only one that didn’t was a company specializing in large leashes for very large dogs. Their clients were almost 100% male under the age of 45, so not many of them would have thumb issues.

I did think about licensing, but I couldn’t find a company that was interested. Most of the manufacturers of hardware for pet products are in Asia. US manufacturers buy from them. As the snap hook is just a part they just wanted to buy from me or from the factory.

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

Lucy: I ended up finding a manufacturer from the tradeshow. Another vendor told me he could help and put me in touch with his factory. Most companies guard their suppliers names incase you try to go around them. The company was in Taiwan and he comes with me when I visit and translates for me.

So far I have funded everything my self. It has been hard working full time and doing everything by my self. Money is always tight and it has been a steep learning curve.

I have just started a crowdfunding campaign on indiegoggo.com, here’s the link.

http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/magneclip-magnetic-snaphook/x/1704284

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sPZsFTVd_jw

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

Lucy: Going to tradeshows has been a great way of getting out there. I had my first booth last October and I had one person helping me out. She has past sales experience. She went to all the other pet leash manufactures at the show with a leaflet with our booth location and information. She took a leash with her and invited them to come and visit. They did.

Vendors get upset if you try to sell them something at the show. They paid for a booth to sell you something. But by inviting them to our booth when they had some down time worked very well. Everyone at the show knew who we were.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

Lucy: One of the most difficult things I found and I’m still finding is dealing with men and their attitude towards me. Manufacturers are still mainly men and they have an opinion that women must be dumb and don’t know what they are talking about. This has cost me a lot of time and money.

An example is every manufacturer has presumed they knew best as they already make snap hooks. True but none of them know anything about magnets. They insisted they do it there way and wanted to cut me out of all the designs. Well after they couldn’t get anything to work they came back to me and I had to fix all their mistakes. I had to give them some very basic physics lessons. This may also be part Asian culture that they can’t admit failure. I’m not entirely sure but it has been an obstacle.

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Lucy: I’m not sure what I would do differently. A good mentor would have been a plus. I’m still looking for one. If you know of any send them my way.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Lucy: My advice to anyone wanting to be an inventor is, get a good education. Far too often girls skip science subjects at school. Having a good fundamental idea of how things work and some practical experience is invaluable.

Do some business studies and learn something about patents and how they work. Read some good business books. If you look for a business partner, look for the opposite to yourself. No point in you both having the same skills. If one of you is good at marketing and accounting then the other needs to be creative. At least one of you needs good people skills.

I outsource everything I’m not good at. 99Designs.com has been great for logo, brochure designs as well as product labels. I also hire from Elance.com I have my CGI drawings done from contractors I found there. I also found a CAD engineer there too.

I have also found so much help from Twitter. There are all kinds of interesting people there. The Shark Tank and Dragons Den has been useful If you can’t get one of the investors to listen to you try the people who were on the show looking for an investment. They will usually respond and help you out with information.

Tara: So what’s next?

Lucy: Well I’m working on the new MagneClip® Secure a locking version of the first MagneClip®. The prototype will be done in a few days. I already have people waiting to see it.

After that it will be those horrible buckles used on dog collars and luggage bags. I received so many complaints about them people have begged me to design a new one.

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

Here are some of my links. If you have any helpful advice please feel free to contact me.

http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/magneclip-magnetic-snaphook/x/1704284

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Fido-Fashion/154720697877517

www.magneclip.com

l.mitchell@magneclip.com

 

 

 

MaKey MaKey Invention Kit to Make Music and More

makey makey invention kit

I just received an email newsletter from Maplins and one of the promotions really caught my eye and I thought it might interest you too. It was for a fun inventors kit called MaKey MaKey, the kind that is probably targeted at kids and then bought by adults (who pretend it’s for their kids). It looks like you can do all sorts of strange things from turning a banana into a keyboard to making a piano out of stairs.

from the website:

“MaKey MaKey is an invention kit for the 21st century. Turn everyday objects into touchpads and combine them with the internet. It’s a simple Invention Kit for Beginners and Experts doing art, engineering, and everything inbetween

Check out the video below to find out more.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfQqh7iCcOU

New York Based Inventors/Makers Wanted for Daily Planet TV Show

Discovery Canada’s flagship science & technology show Daily Planet is looking to profile New York-based inventors/makers as part of a series being filmed called “Garage Gurus.”

This segment would air as part of the weekly segment called Future Tech, hosted by Lucas Cochran. Future Tech is all about featuring the best in tech – the coolest new gadgets, the most innovative & inventive technologies and the science behind it all. Here is a link to some past segments: http://www.discovery.ca/Article.aspx?aid=35017.

For this segment, they’re looking for people who are not shy on camera, who have amazing working product prototypes, featuring cool technology, that Lucas can put to the test.

In terms of availability, The shoot will take place on Saturday, Jan 26th ideally a full day shoot

For your information: Daily Planet is the internationally award-winning flagship show of Discovery Canada. Now in its 18th season, Daily Planet is the first nightly primetime science magazine show in the world and has grown in the last decade to become a powerhouse of science and technology broadcasting internationally. With combined plays on Discovery and the full CTV network, Daily Planet reaches an impressive 2.8 million viewers each week in Canada, and millions more on the web.

If you interested, or if you know someone who is, please contact heather.sherman@bellmedia.ca or 416.384.7483.

Free Tutorials to Learn to Build a Website for your Product Invention

Build-a-Website-Tutorial

For a while now I have been planning to create some FREE video tutorials to help inventors on a tight budget build their own website in order to sell and promote the product they have created. The video tutorials and site is finally done though it might still be a bit rough round the edges. You don’t need to sign up or give your email etc to watch the videos.

You can find the videos at www.buildawebsite.com

What you will learn in the Free Video Tutorials

The videos are not designery or techie and I have aimed to keep them as simple as possible so you can follow along step by step. In essence you will learn how to set up your own easy to update website without any technical knowledge and you will also learn how to add a simple Paypal button to sell your product.

List of Build a Website Video Tutorials

  • If you don’t already own a domain name or hosting start here
  • Check Domain availability
  • Buying Hosting and a Domain Name

If you already own a domain name start here

  • Buying Hosting if you Already Own your Domain Name
  • Pointing an Existing Domain Name to your New Hosting
  • Add your Domain to your New Web Hosting

Now you have a domain name and hosting continue here

  • Login in to your Web Hosting Control Panel
  • Install WordPress
  • Login to WordPress
  • Create your First Web Page
  • Making your Web URLs Look Better
  • Add an Image to your web page
  • Finding Royalty Free Images
  • Choose a Theme for your Website
  • Download WordPress themes from external site
  • Install External Themes on Your Website
  • Customising your Theme and Navigation Menus
  • Adding things to your Sidebar with Widgets
  • Adding a Contact Form Using a Plugin
  • More about Plugins and Adding Sitemap
  • Keywords and a Plugin for Search Engine Optimsation SEO
  • Adding a Youtube Video to a Web Page
  • Remove Commenting from your Web Pages
  • Templates and Changing your Landing Page

Selling your Product or Service from your Website

  • How to Create a Paypal Button so you can Sell from your Website
  • Add a Paypal Buy Now Button to your Website
  • Centre your Paypal Buy Now Button without Coding
  • Looking at Shopify to Sell Online
  • Creating Navigation Links to External Websites

Making a Banner Image

  • Cropping an Image to Use as a Web Banner
  • Creating a Web Banner in an Image Editing Program

Creating an Optional Blog on Your Website

  • Adding an Optional Blog to your Website
  • Creating Categories for your Blog Posts
  • Comments and Pingbacks on your Blog
  • Approving Comments on your Blog Posts

Backing up Your Website

  • Backing up your WordPress Site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share your Inventor Story on IdeasUploaded

inventor story

A belated Happy New Year from me, who has been very lazy not blogging over the holiday period.

Would you be interested in sharing your inventor story?

Would you consider sharing your inventor story good or bad, so others can learn from your successes or mistakes?

Plus it will give you a bit of extra exposure for yourself and your product (this blog gets between 6000 – 7000 visitors a month).

You can see some inventor interview examples here

Please answer the inventor interview questions below

Please answer the questions below, which you can download as a text file here or as a Word file here

Then email the questions and answers to me at tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com with a pic of yourself and one of your invention/product. Please answer the questions in as much detail as possible to help others.

1. Your name, invention name and website URL?

2. Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

3. Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

4. What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

5. Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

6. Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

7. Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

8. How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

9. What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

10. What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

11. How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

12. Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

13. What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

14. Where can people find out more about you your invention?