Interview with Sandra Frawley about her Invention SeatPak

Sandra Frawley with her SeatPak InventionIn this inventor interview Sandra Frawley, inventor of SeatPak, talks about how she came up with her invention idea after struggling to carry a child’s car seat, hold her son’s hand and hold a diaper bag and coat all at the same time. The SeatPak was her solution to the problem for busy moms on the go.

Tara: Your name, invention name and website URL?

Sandra: Sandra Frawley, 

SeatPak – www.babybindle.com

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are
based, your background experience how you first started 
inventing?

Sandra: 



I am based out of New York. I have been a stay at home mom since the birth 
of my son in 2004, before that I was a Registered Veterinary Technician. I
 have thought of ideas, but never followed through or saw them on the market
 already after doing a search.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention,
what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Seat Pack InventionSandra: I invented the SeatPak, a mini diaper bag that attaches to the handle of an 
infant car seat, stroller, luggage and more. After the birth of my daughter
 in 2009, I was carrying the car seat, struggling with a coat and a diaper bag
 while trying to keep a hold of my son’s hand. I realized during my errands 
that my daughter was napping and I didn’t need to carry the big diaper bag.
 I started slipping my keys, phone and wallet between her legs and the seat.
Then I went down to just carrying keys phone and a credit card in my pockets 
after losing my wallet a couple of times. On a trip back home after an
 errand I was thinking of my dilemma and that if only I could find a little
bag that would attach to the handle of the car seat to put my things in
 while I shopped. After searching the net and finding nothing that solved my
problem I sat and sketched a couple of ideas, made a few prototypes and knew
that I couldn’t be the only mom out there with this problem.

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Sandra: Well, I shelved the idea for about 5 months, I had no funding and didn’t
want to go into debt bringing the SeatPak to market. In June of 2010 I saw
a Facebook post about someone who had entered the Huggies Mom Inspired Grant
 competition. Thinking I couldn’t really lose anything I entered, forgot
 about it until a month later when the director of the program called to tell
 me I was one of the winners chosen to receive a $15,000 grant to develop my
 invention

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42j4Cz9D-kQ

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a
 prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

Sandra: I had already made the prototype, so I took those to a manufacturer who then
 was able to produce a more professional prototype

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and
how did you go about it?

Sandra: I did. I had a provisional patent done which lasted one year, which then I 
had turned into a utility patent

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself
or did you look into licensing the idea?

Sandra: I always intended to manufacture my idea

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your
invention and did you self fund this?

Sandra: 
I attended a trade show which put me in contact with a few manufacturers.
The funding came from the grant

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your
invention?

Sandra: Facebook, Twitter, Giveaways and getting write ups.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your 
invention to market?

Sandra: It is a hard road! I would do it again in a heartbeat. Getting into retail 
is very hard. It is very competitive out there for shelf space. Getting
 your name out there so that people know your product exists is very tough as
 well

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to
 market?

Sandra: About a year and a half

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that 
you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Sandra: I think I would have allocated a little more in my budget for advertising

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an 
idea?

Sandra: The road I have taken has led me to what I know today and what I need to
 succeed going forward. Learn from your mistakes, don’t get hung up on them,
 but move on knowing there was a lesson to be learned from them in order to
take the next step that will move you forward.

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

Sandra: 

On my website at www.babybindle.com

Twitter: @babybindle
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Babybindle/157816857564459

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Interview with Inventor Ginny Scales-Medeiros about her Self Tanning System Invention

Ginny Scales-Medeiro InventorIn this inventor interview Ginny Scales-Medeiros talks about how she came up with the idea for her Flawless Self Tanning Invention and how she developed it, got it to market and publicised it.

Tara: Your name, invention name and website URL?

Ginny: Ginny Scales-Medeiros Flawless Selftanning System www.ginnyscalesmedeiros.com

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Ginny: I am located in the SanFrancisco Northbay, Santa Rosa I have had dreams about inventions my whole life and talk about it in my New Novel “What is Normal?” www.whatisnormal.tv I have no experiance in this field and Eli Whitney the inventor of the cotton gin, had no prior experience with the cotton industry. We are visionarys

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Ginny: Knowing the dangers of too much sun or cancer causing tanning beds. Sunless tanning is the best option,yet there are down sides. I bought clear sunless tanning products that you couldn’t see while applying them and ended up with streaks.I also bought the sunless products with dyes and bronzers that showed where she was applying them, but were messy and the dyes stained my sheets and clothes. I knew there was a market out there for sunless tanning products and had seen for myself the flaws in what was presently available, which made me determined to create a sunless tanning product that was flawless.

I spent hours and hours on the computer learning about different ingredients, different light responsive compounds and how to get My idea patented. I had got my idea while at Disneyland. When entering the park, they stamped my hand and the hands of my children. Right there, I had a light bulb moment. I thought why not take the ingredient in all sunless tanning products, dihydroxyacetone, that is invisible when applying it and add a light responsive ingredient that shows up under a special light. You could then see where you were applying your sunless product under the hand held light. If you missed a spot, you could fix it. No need for any added messy dyes or bronzers.

Self Tanning Invention

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Ginny: I started mixing formulations in my Kitchen. I entered contests with it and Won 1st place in a national Woman’s magazine “New Woman Magazine”

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

Ginny: I mixed standard store bought sunless tanners with Light responsive ingredients. If you take a black light into your bathroom you will see many products contain Light responsive ingredients that you already put on your skin.

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Ginny: I hired a Patent Trademark lawyer. 1st International patent search. 2nd apply for patent.

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Ginny: I started manufacturing with a boutique manufacturer. It cost more money but the assistance I got from them was valuable starting out.

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

Ginny: I looked for someone in suncare and making quality products.

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

Ginny: I contacted editors from top magazines and was featured in Elle, Fitness, Shape, Health, on ABC,NBC, and knocked on the doors of World Class Spa resorts like The Canyon Ranch. I also pitched QVC my self and got to sell it on air myself too.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

Ginny: The most difficult elements for me were the nay sayers. I do have a personality that enjoys the win of proving I can… Thank God Literally and figuratively!

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Ginny: I started my research in 1994 and was awarded my 1st patent in 1997. I started manufacturing it while it was patent pending (understand you have more protection while your patent is pending, because no one knows what you have until it is public) about 3 yrs to get to market.

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Ginny: Yes, I would have stuck with building a foundation in one area and grow from there.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Ginny: 1st you know if you have a real invention if  you can NOT stop thinking about it, until its manifested. Mke sure you have done a comprehensive International Patent search before anything else and is there a market for it?

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

Ginny: You may google Ginny Flawless self tanning or go to http://whatisnormal.tv/ginny/invention/ click on the Press and Spa page too this part of my journey is included in my new Novel “What is Normal?” and I am also a free Agent with my Registerd Trademark & Patents up for license

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Interview with Inventor Lydia delRossi about her Invention StepnSoak

stepnsoak inventor Lydia delRossiIn this inventor interview Lydia delRossi explains how she came up with her invention StepnSoak out of necessity when on of her horses had a hoof abscess and she couldn’t find a cheap and easy product to use for soaking her horses hoof. She has since expanded here range to include products for human use.

Tara: Please can you tell me your name, invention name and website URL?

Lydia: My name is Lydia delRossi, I reside in Aiken SC and my product has a formally trademarked name of “StepnSoak” with a second division known as “StepnSoak4Feet” with websites www.stepnsoak.com and www.stepnsoak4feet.com

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Lydia: My invention was born of necessity – I was a Health Insurance Broker who owned several horses in Aiken, SC with no background in inventing. One developed a nasty hoof abscess and I had a difficult time treating it as all the “hoof soaking boots” on the market were expensive, awkward, difficult to use and/or small and inflexible. Out of sheer frustration I sketched what I wanted – then took the steps to make it happen. I designed the first “one piece – one step – slip on and tie” set of soaking boots that has morphed into human use. It was passion and frustration.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gk6Zj4hESk0

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Lydia: The first sketches were made by myself – it was not a complicated design as I had a clear idea of what I wanted to use on my horse myself. These were the original design I sent to my first prototype manufacturer. I searched for months online all over the world for exactly my idea – and then I contacted a patent attorney to do a full search so I do not waste my time or money on a product that may already exist elsewhere.

StepnSoak Horse leg invention

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

Lydia: I consulted the Thomas Registry to seek out plastic and vinyl manufactures in the US , once I found one (so many vinyl products are done in Asia) that was reasonable in price and would sign an non-compete – I faxed my sketching and he made 10 prototypes in my initial design for me to test

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Lydia: I did hire a locally based patent attorney to file for a utility patent and we also filed for Trademark name protection – I always felt without a patent you have nothing to sell if a large company was ever interested – that is when the true detailed sketches and formal designs were properly done and a utility patent was filed

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Lydia: I had no idea one could license an idea (!) – I always saw a market for my product as a long term horse owner and knew I had “created a better mousetrap” for that exact – very common problem with hoofed animals. The human morph is what surprised me – but only for a second – the equine aspect was a true “beta test” of strength and durability – otherwise a slip on set of “foot soaking” boots to replace a tub or pan on the floor makes excellent sense

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

Lydia: I first sought medical product manufacturers – IV bags, pool toys, water-beds and the like as that was the type vinyl I wanted to create my slip on soaking boots from – however – 99.9% of all that manufacturing is done in Asia and I wanted a 100% AMERICAN product – so I was fortunate to find a company that did military and medical contracts on the West coast – very easy to work with and cost effective. Although it was mid 2009 and the market had put the world into a tailspin I was lucky enough to be able to sell a art gallery I co-owned with my daughter and the small time payments form that sale funded the StepnSoak project as I still had my ongoing insurance business for the day to day living costs – between StepnSoak and insurance deals I worked constantly!

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

Lydia: I initially brought StepnSoak to market by contacting all the major equine health/lifestyle catalogs with this fresh new idea and I reinforced it by also contacting and sending out press releases in the equine specific market. The samples I sent to all the purchasing agents, shared copies of articles written and “buzz” created by sharing all media with each other put StepnSoak squarely in every large horse health catalog in America by late 2010 – and those sales just keep growing as the product performed EXACTLY as I said it would – no surprises.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

Lydia: The StepnSoak equine aspect was not difficult at all to bring to market as I was simply introducing a better way to do a established act – it has since go onto use in zoos for large pawed animals and in Hobby Farms across America for use on prize cattle, llama, goats, sheep and any backyard animal as the vinyl is flexible, durable and can be folded and/or rolled down to fit any size hoof or large animal paw – the human aspect is more challenging as it is a entire new approach to the act of foot soaking vs a pan of water on the floor. Once we launched the site StepnSoak4Feet.com we had 3,000 orders in the first 10 days from a very respected pharmaceutical company for a foot fungus clinical trial – we knew we were on to something big. We have since been written up in blogs and newspapers across America from press releases and samples – just as we did with the equine division.

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Lydia: Start up to market – the idea was born in June of 2009 – prototyped in Dec or 2009 and we were offered nationwide in our first large “lifestyle” catalog in mid 2010 – once we were in one large catalog the rest followed – we are currently in all the largest equine/animal health product catalogs in America

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Lydia: I accidentally did a lot of things right because I was self-funded and had no money to make too many mistakes and I had a ton of passion for this product – I did learn that although the original manufacturer was great to work with the shipping costs were drowning me and I looked a bit harder and actually found a vinyl manufacturer right her in SC which dropped my shipping costs – if I could do it over I wouldd have been better financed – we are NOT in debt but I sure would like to buy PR and more marketing as I think that is what I will need to get the foot product moving faster than it is not – that may be a licensing deal.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Lydia: My advice? Never ever ever give up – hire a attorney to research the market first so you don’t waste time and money – don’t think it will be easy – eat , sleep and breath your product and seek ways to make it better – don’t read blogs about overnight millionaires – we were approached by a “Seen on TV ” type company – they wanted to tie up the product and give us a small % for a long period of time – if you love it and believe in it and are willing to work for it – it can come true

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

Lydia: The StepnSoak websites www.stepnsoak.com www.stepnsoak4feet.com
Best article lately tells my tale well : Both a blog and a newspaper article:

StepNSoak product invention

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Interview with the Inventors of the Linziclip Hair Accessory

Inventors of the LinziclipThis inventor interview features 2 co-inventors Lindsey Walker and Shelley-Anne Salisbury who invented a hair accessory called the Linziclip www.linshell.com

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Lindsey’s background
I took out my first patent in my early twenties which was a hair fringe attached to a hair band, called Fringe Benefits. I manufactured and launched the product in Selfridges and in Bloomingdales soon afterwards. At that time, I was an actress and it was decided it would be best to keep my hair simple and long with no fringe. Yearning for a way to get rid of my boring hairstyle, I came up with this idea which was initially supposed to be used just for me! Then I thought I would license it and went from wig company to wig company, but with no success. At that time were so few wig companies as fake hair was for old ladies! They were not the fashion accessories they are today – but nobody would take me seriously. So in the end, I found a business partner and we flew to Hong Kong where we met with an agent who then introduced us to factories in HK and China and had the hairpieces made ourselves.

Shelley-Anne’s background
Shelley-Anne was a very successful lawyer – and the first fashion / commercial lawyer working with some of the big fashion names like Jimmy Choo. Another expertise was intellectual property and putting clients together.

Together, we invented the Linziclip.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about the Linziclip, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Lindsey: Shelley-Anne and I met at a party and were introduced. Shortly afterwards, we decided to start a business together. At the first or second meeting, Shelley-Anne had a butterfly clip in her hair and leant back, with the teeth digging painfully into the back of her head! She quickly removed the clip. We just looked at each other and had a Eureeka moment! We decided that we would try and re create the butterfly clip getting rid of the bits we hated – springs showing, ears digging into the back of the head, clip slipping, ugly shape and come up with an alternative.

linziclip hair accessory invention

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Lindsey: We first went to see someone to mock up the idea but they said that it was physically impossible because the dynamics of the clip were wrong and would not open. We wanted to prove them wrong and show the clip could be opened and closed. It did take time……but we managed to in the end!

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of the the Linziclip?

Lindsey: Before any drawings, we took a loo roll and cut it in half and slid the two sections together. Clearly, it didn’t look very pretty, so Shelley-Anne took some silver spray to colour the toilet roll – not much better! We then added some glitter and looked proudly at our first mock up ! It looked awful – and we fell about laughing! After we patented the clip, we cold called a distributor and met up with him to guage his thoughts. We couldn’t believe that we actually showed him the loo roll – and that he actually thought the idea was good!!

Our next step was getting drawings and then an SLS prototype was made.

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Lindsey: We took out patents immediately and once we launched, we took out patent insurance. I think we are patented in about 50 countries.

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing Linziclip yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Lindsey: I had already licensed one of my ideas, which was a butterfly clip attached to a ponytail of hair which sold under the Revlon label, but didn’t like the licensing idea at all. I did try licensing a hairdryer and some other inventions, but everyone was scared to risk money. With licensing, you have little or no control and basically you surrender your baby. You have to put a huge amount of trust with the company you are working with. Many companies are sadly not honest and are underhand with the amount of units that are really sold, so you can find yourself with a shortfall without even realising it…..

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for the Linziclip and did you self fund this?

Lindsey: Nothing like Google looking for finding manufacturers! I found ours in India on an Indian website and contacted them. When they met us, they wanted to know where Mr Walker and Mr Salisbury was! This factory had never worked with women and couldn’t believe it was run by women.

It took a long time, but in the end we got a DTI loan, investors and also put money in ourselves.

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting Linziclip?

Lindsey: We are not selling in the UK but through distributors in North America, Japan, Russia and parts of Europe. The best way to create awareness is through PR and if you can afford it – advertising! We don’t believe the word of mouth thing really works…..

Below, for example, is how the Americans promote the Linziclip

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BpTFcYlAEG0&feature=share
http://www.myspringfieldmommy.com/2012/01/scunci-liniclip-review-giveaway.html

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing Linziclip to market?

Lindsey: We thought that anything fresh and new would be very exciting for a buyer, but discovered the opposite. Many retailers hate risk and are not happy buying something new and most like to work with the manufacturer and distributors that they have always worked with. The problem is, is that it is easier to say ‘no’ than it is to say ‘yes’. The only way passed that is to stay determined, enthusiastic and focussed.

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Lindsey: I think it was three or four years.

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing the Linziclip that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Lindsey: Lots !!

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Lindsey: This is a huge question with an even larger answer. Let us give just a few pointers for now. First, they need to check with a patent agent that their invention doesn’t exist. The worst thing to do is to start on something to discover a similar invention has already been patented! Then they need to take out a patent application which is a very expensive process but must be done by an expert. Once that process has taken place, the next thing is to get drawings and more importantly, mock ups done. After that, they need to decide on whether they want to license it or make and sell it themselves. If they don’t feel they would make a good business person, then maybe licensing is for them.

Tara: Where can people find out more about you and the Linziclip?

Please visit our website on www.linshell.com or linziclip Facebook / twitter. Overseas, people can find the Linziclips in CVS, RiteAId etc and AS Watston, Muller, Etos etc. We also sell on Amazon, Glitz4Girlz, Drugstore.com etc.

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Interview about Hally Norton the Inventor of the Original Cosmo Finger Guard

Hally inventor of Cosmo finger guardIn this inventor interview, Hally Norton’s business partner talks about how Hally came up with the idea for the Cosmo Finger Guard and how they developed the product and brought it to market.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience and how you first started inventing (ie. was the Cosmo Finger Guard your first invention)?

Hally Norton is based in Cedar Rapids, IA and has been a licensed professional cosmetologist for the last 24 years and is currently a master designer. This is her first invention. Hally does have a business partner behind the scenes who assisted with the business plan, filing the patent, glove material, manufacturing and marketing. However Hally is responsible for the design and shape the half palm, fingerless glove you see today known as The Original Cosmo Finger Guard.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about the Cosmo Finger Guard, what it is and how you came up with the idea?

The idea come from the fact that Hally had just cut her self to the point where she needed stitches. This was not the first time she had to make an Emergency Room visit. She has lost count of the actual number of times over the years she has received a cut. When I found out I asked what her if there is anything available to wear to prevent the cuts. And there isn’t anything on the market that is designed for a Cosmetologist in mind. Gloves are available gloves to protect there hands from chemicals but that is it. This is when I decided to make one ourselves. The original Cosmo Finger Guard is a two finger, half palm cut resistant glove designed to add a layer of protection to the fingers to reduce the risk of cuts.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CwWjnY5Jmrg

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

The first steps we took was to research available materials that are available today that are used for cut resistant applications for hands. Such as the materials used for cutting culinary, industrial applications and law enforcement cut resistant gloves. So finding the right fabric and yarn actually was not that difficult and was readily available. We just needed to find a manufacture who would be willing to work with us in a confidential manner to create samples and various designs to test. We ended up with about 6 different styles and shapes in the beginning which was back in October/November of 2010 and after a year of testing we finally decided on the two finger half Palm glove made (HMWPE) High Molecular Weight Polyethylene Fiber.

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea straight away or did you develop it first?

Yes we decided to file a provisional patent right away to get the design on record. How did you go about getting protection for your idea?

In addition to filing the provisional patent we asked everyone we talked with to sign Non Disclosures in advance. This included the individual we received 3D drawings from, the manufacturer, the company we receive are materials from and our web design team. No one objected and everyone was OK with it and understood.

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of the Cosmo Finger Guard, how did you go about it?

Yes as I mentioned we had professional 3D renderings made, as well as dozens of samples and prototypes. Making contact with the right people was a combination of friends in the business world, co workers and a lot of time researching the Internet and making phone calls.

Tara: Did you look into licensing Cosmo Finger Guard or was it always your intention to manufacture and sell it yourself?

We started out and are currently selling the product ourselves online and business to business. However we realize it is in our interest to expand and have different sources of distribution. We are currently in talks with a few distributors who have shown interest in carrying our product and have a larger presence in the Hair Styling industry.

Tara: Did you fund the development of the product yourself or take on outside investment?

We currently are fundng this ourselves.

Tara: What have you found are the most successful ways of promoting the Cosmo Finger Guard?

Having a web site built by professional who understands online marketing and search engine optimization. We have also promoted Facebook, Twitter and You Tube. We started with phone calls to potential large clients and started shipping out samples to test and we are still in the middle of that sales process and promoting it. We have personally went out and visited the salons in our area and dropped samples and talked with salon stylists and owners. Email marketing is something we have been doing as well. targeting owners and corporate salons.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your product to market?

I would have to say finding a manufacturer who had the right equipment to make a half palm two finger glove. Since this is a non traditional design. The second most difficult thing we experienced was getting the different sizes of gloves made to fit small and large hands and strong enough to withstand a nick or cut without taking away from the flexibility of finger movement. We needed it to still be somewhat thin and not big and bulky. then we needed to keep in mind we have to deal with germs. So we also needed an antimicrobial fiber and washable. We also decided to go with an ambidextrous style.

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

We started in October of 2010 and went to market at the end of August 2011.

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing the Cosmo Finger Guard that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

We honestly had very good support along the way and everyone was very helpful. So we were pretty lucky to be surrounded by the right people. We had to keep everything hush until we was ready.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

If you feel you have a product or idea and have researched the market very well…we say go for it. However do not get in any hurry and take your time and test, test, test. Make sure you use Non Disclosures, get the patent filed and surround yourself with professionals who can answer your questions and have been there before.

Tara: Where can people connect with you and find out more about Cosmo Finger Guard?

Our web site: www.cosmofingerguard.com or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=exlXs0rUWW4&feature=related

If you enjoyed this inventor interview you can read more here and check out the podcast here.

Are you an inventor with an interesting story to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

UK Mumpreneurs TV Opportunity

Mumpreneur

Lisa Warner

The Mumpreneur Show, which is the brainchild of Lisa Warner, creator of Fink Cards (which inspires and instigates family communication) is in collaboration between mumpreneurs in a search for new and cost effective routes to market their products.

“We wanted to make TV advertising affordable!” says Warner, “and we are now able to offer an opportunity to be on the show.”

Mumpreneurs have a five minute TV slot introducing their product

The format of the show includes the mumpreneurs, within a five minute slot, introducing their product whilst explaining the reason or story behind its creation, which is always of great interest. The products will then be readily available for viewers to purchase. “These shorter slots are going to be a truly fantastic opportunity for the products to gain the huge exposure which they deserve, and of course this will open up a whole new audience for the mumpreneurs.” says Warner.  In addition, added advantages to being involved in the TV project include adding their new marketing tag ‘As Seen on TV” as well as using the footage of the filming of their product on their own website.   As there is going to be a massive PR campaign driving attention to the channel, it will mean a lot more exposure for the products.  The intention is to also attract attention from other retailers who could also be selling the products being displayed on the show.

Ideal World Channel will market the show to between 150,000 and 200,000 customers

Lyndsey Young Inventor and Queen of Easy Green

Lyndsey Young

“It is planned that the Ideal World Channel will market the show to between 150,000 and 200,000 customers, as well as air repeats of the live show on two further shopping channels, almost trebling the exposure of these products“ says Warner, who is truly excited about this new venture of hers, which she is proud to be collaborating on with Lyndsey Young and (myself) Tara Roskell.

Interested mumpreneurs who book a slot for the first show will be part of the Ideal World PR Strategy

Interested mumpreneurs who book a slot for the first show are asked to keep 8th September free as Lisa, Lyndsay and Tara are organising an event which will include a tour of the studio and production facilities of which Ideal World are planning a PR strategy for.  The day will include interviews and photo opportunities with the mumpreneurs.

Book your place on The Mumpreneur Show

Places are very limited, therefore, if you want to ensure you grab your opportunity of exposure to over 200,000 potential new customers and more, then note that you can purchase your dedicated 5 minute slot on The Mumpreneur Show, which is airing on Ideal World on the 13th October for an investment bargain of only £750 plus VAT. Longer pitches are available for £2500 + VAT which will be for approximately 18 minutes of airtime.

For more information or to book your slot, please email me, Tara Roskell via the contact page or tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com