Interview with Carla Leming Inventor of the Speed Bather for Dogs

In this inventor interview Carla Leming explains how she came up with the idea for her invention the Speed Bather

Carla Leming InventorTara: What is your name, invention name and website/invention website URL?

Carla: Name:  Carla Leming, Invention: The Speed Bather, Website URL:  www.PetEdge.com
Page on PetEdge website where the Speed Bather is for sale:  http://www.petedge.com/product/Master-Grooming-Tools-Speed-Bather-Bathing-Tools/58807.uts

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience and how you first started inventing?

Carla: I live in Mattoon, Illinois, a small town located in the central part of the state.  I’m presently a hairstylist, but I’ve also dabbled in other lines of work, such as singing in a band, being a dance instructor and working as a graphic artist at a printing company.  I seem to be drawn to jobs that give me a creative outlet.   I’ve always noticed improvements or changes I’d like to make to product designs, but never had an outlet until crowdsourcing websites began to spring up online.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Carla: The Speed Bather is a dual-purpose dog bathing tool with flexible silicone fingers on one side for working shampoo deep into the fur when lathering.  The opposite side of the tool has silicone “fins” to squeegee excess water down the drain before towel-drying.  The idea for this dog bathing tool came to me when using multiple towels to dry off my long-aired dog after her bath.  I knew there had to be a way to flush a good deal of this water down the drain, before I began toweling her off.  A slick squeegee with a scalloped edge came to mind, and the Speed Bather was born – and much thanks be given to Genius Crowds for refining my original vision into a sleek quality product.

Tara: Did you create a roughy prototype or drawings to test out and present your ideas?

Carla: I didn’t make a prototype, but I did use my drawing program to make illustrations for the “Dog Squeegee”, as it was originally titled.  When I began refining my idea, I added the silicone shampooing “fingers” to make the tool dual-purpose.

Tara: You submitted your idea to Genius Crowds and it won, please can you tell me a bit about it works?

Carla: At Genius Crowds, the panel of judges are constantly looking over new and old submissions for ideas that catch their interest.  My dog bathing tool wasn’t selected for a contract until many months after it had been submitted to a Pets call-out round.  All ideas are free to submit at GC, and the generous community members offer input and suggestions to help ideas along.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PRN19wkMDmE

speed bather invention

Tara: You submit a lot of ideas, have you got any tips for coming up with original ideas, what is your process?

Carla: I wish I could say I have a definitive creative process when it comes to product ideas, but I don’t.  Mostly, my ideas are inspired by a problem I’d like to solve that I’ve recently been reminded of during my daily life.  Sometimes my ideas are completely unique and others are just improvements on existing gadgets and devices used every day.

Tara: After your idea was chosen as as a winner, what was the process from this point, did you get involved with further design input?

Carla: After receiving email notification that Genius Crowds has selected your idea as a prototype contender, you will be emailed a copy of their contract to sign and return.  I have two other contracts with Genius Crowds, and during the months after being selected, I’ve been kept in the loop on their progress, when there was news to be shared.  With all three of my selected ideas, I’ve been asked to send new drawings or been contacted for more input on each of those chosen ideas.

Tara: What are the pros and cons of submitting ideas to sites like Genius Crowds rather than developing it or licensing it yourself.

Carla: For me, invention websites are ideal, because I am not much of a gambler.  I would be extremely reluctant to financially back one of my ideas that could end up costing our life’s savings.  I’m still amazed at the number of ideas I think are sure-fire winners, that have been passed over time and again.  Obviously, the professionals on the judging panels know a lot more about the marketplace than I do.

Tara: What happens now, will you have a share of royalties in the product sales?

Carla: I will get a 25% share of the royalties paid to Genius Crowds.  I’m looking forward to receiving my first check in the mail – no matter what the amount.  It will be a thrill to know that my two years of submitting ideas will give me a return on my time invested.

Tara: What are your future invention plans and dreams?

Carla: My future plans are to take the time to learn at least one of the many 3D drawing programs I’ve bought or downloaded.  I’ve been using a very old version of Microsoft Publisher for my illustrations, and I’d like to be able to submit more professional presentations of my ideas.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Carla: Don’t become married to an idea that doesn’t seem to get the attention you think it deserves.  Use that creative energy to move onto other problems that need to be solved.  One day, you’ll hit upon a solution that will resonate with the buying public!

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

Carla: The Speed Bather can be found here on the PetEdge website:  https://www.petedge.com/product/Master-Grooming-Tools-Speed-Bather-Bathing-Tools/58807.uts

PetEdge is a wholesale company that sells to professional pet groomers and to independent pet supply stores all over the world.

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Interview with Sally Guyer Creator of Cambridge RainCoats – Fashion Rainwear for Bicycles

In this inventor interview Sally Guyer talks about creating her product Cambridge Raincoats, because when she wanted a stylish yet functional raincoat she could wear cycling and couldn’t find one.

Tara: Please could you tell me your name, product name and website URL?

Sally: Sally Guyer, The Cambridge Raincoat Company; Cambridge Raincoats – fashion rainwear for upright bicycles; www.cambridgeraincoats.co.uk

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Saly: I live 5 miles south of Cambridge, the UK’s number 1st city of cycling.  My life is bike-based and that is how I prefer to get around. My daily commute is 5 miles each way, cycling into central Cambridge in all weathers all year round. I’m not interested in cycling as a sport and I don’t like sports clothes.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your product, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Sally: As a busy woman, I wanted a fully functional coat that I could wear without embarrassment or needing to change on arrival at my destination.  I couldn’t find it so decided to create it myself. Cambridge Raincoats are the first coats to combine Savile Row styling with high performance fabric in bright colours. This means it’s unnecessary to wear hi-vis and that the coats are lightweight, highly water-resistant, windproof, breathable and washable.  Nevertheless, they look like groovy ‘normal’ coats anyone might like to wear.

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Sally: I’ve never worked in the clothing industry so didn’t know where to start. Before the Internet got going, I tried going to the library and asking around but it was the Internet which really allowed me to drive the idea forward. Having access to so much information was life-changing.

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

Sally: I can’t draw so I asked around to find a pattern cutter. I then explained my idea to her and she drew what I described before producing the prototype.

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Sally: I tried to copywrite my idea but found I can’t copywrite the concept; I can protect individual garment design, the company name, colours, brand image etc but not the concept.

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Sally: I always intended to manufacture (via outsourcing) but am also currently investigating licensing the idea too.

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

Sally: It was like kissing a lot of toads before finding your prince! It was thanks to a mentor I acquired via a Linked In group that I met my manufacturer, the one I use now.

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

Sally: Social media has been a godsend but having the support of local businesses and winning a business competition have also been instrumental. In the beginning, I used social media to connect with all the relevant bike groups I could find in the world. Being a Spanish speaker helped a lot.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

Sally: Funding.

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Sally: I had to sit on the idea for over 5 years before finding a way to bring it to market.

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Sally: No. Mistakes made are valuable and an opportunity to learn something new.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Sally: Don’t give up. Don’t seek other people’s approval, take yourself seriously.

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your product?

Sally: On our website, www.cambridgeraincoats.co.uk

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Interview with Rebecca Rabson about her Invention SmartSeat Chair Protector

Becky Inventor of SmartSeat Chair ProtectorIn this inventor interview Rebecca Rabson explains how she developed her invention SmartSeat Chair Protectors from a need that she and her family had.

Tara: What is your name, invention name and website URL?

Rebecca: Rebecca Rabson, SmartSeat Chair Protector, www.smartseatdiningchaircovers.com

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Rebecca: I live in Newton, MA with my two boys and my husband, who also is one of my business partners. Our third partner is a dear friend with two kids of his own. He lives with his family in CT. My background is in the law. I practiced white collar criminal defense in NYC for several years before having kids and had been a stay-at-home mom for about 8 years before we launched our company.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Rebecca: The SmartSeat is a waterproof, stain resistant, and machine washable seat cover for upholstered dining room and kitchen chairs. It protects like a vinyl seat cover, but is made from a soft and comfortable fabric. I came up with the idea after we purchased a new dining room set for our home. I couldn’t find any waterproof seat covers that provided discreet protection, got the thumbs up from my kids, and didn’t entirely change the look of my chairs.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EU1jax8TaYc

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Rebecca: After coming up with the idea, I created my own prototype, although I didn’t think of it as a prototype at the time. I simply wanted something that I could use! After getting great feedback about my covers from friends and family, my husband put me in touch with a woman who helped us create an official prototype and the pattern and specs necessary to contact manufacturers. We also began the patent process.

seat cover invention

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

Rebecca: Though I made the first samples of the covers to use on my own chairs, our first official prototype was created by a designer. She also created our pattern and spec sheets.

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Rebecca: Once it became clear that we were going to work on bringing this idea to market, we filed a provisional patent. We then hired an attorney to filed our patent application.

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Rebecca: We never considered licensing our idea.

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

Rebecca: The internet is a wonderful resource! I located contract manufacturers throughout the US and contacted several before settling on a factory in PA based on the quality of their work and the price that they quoted. They’ve been making our covers since we started about 18 mos. ago.

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

Rebecca: We have not engaged in any paid marketing. Most of our promotion has been through social media (facebook, twitter, pinterest) and word of mouth, as well as SEO and blogger reviews.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

Rebecca: The most difficult element was just getting started. I knew nothing about manufacturing and the learning curve was steep. Lack of resources also made things challenging, as we are self-funded and were never interested in either getting deeply in debt or seeking outside funding.

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Rebecca: It was approximately 6 mos. between creating our first official prototype and our first online sale.

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Rebecca: Absolutely. You learn a lot along the way. I would work to ensure that I had much bigger margins if I could do it all over again. Though I love our fabric (I think that it is what makes my covers so special), it is unfortunately expensive. And we have been unable to find alternatives that I think are as high quality.

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

Rebecca: Anyone interested in learning more about SmartSeats can visit our website, www.smartseatdiningchaircovers.com, our facebook page, www.facebook.com/seatcover, or email us directly, service@pbjdiscoveries.com

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

The Invention of Thumbby an Interview with the Inventor Katherine Wolfe

Katherine Wolfe Inventor of ThumbbyAn inventor interview with inventor Katherine Wolfe who created who created the Thumbby™ Soft Massage Cone

Tara: What is Your name, invention name and website URL?

Katherine: I’m Katherine Wolfe, my invention is called the Thumbby™ Soft Massage Cone, and our website is at http://www.thumbby.com

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Katherine: Our company is based in Portland, Or. I am a software engineer with an interest in massage and bodywork because of chronic pain issues. I started inventing because I needed a massage tool that was comfortable for me to use.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Katherine: The Thumbby™Massage Cone is a massage tool made of soft silicone rubber, that’s shaped like a cone with a rounded tip. It feels like a thumb and magnifies force, so it helps anyone give deep massage regardless of hand strength. I invented the Thumbby™ because I lost strength in my hands from a congenital spinal problem and so couldn’t massage people well. Hard massage tools were uncomfortable both for me and the people I was trying to massage, so I made a kind of rounded cone out of clay, then made a mold of it in hard plastic and experimented with various materials to find the right “feel”. Silicone gave us what we were looking for in a material because of its natural feel and non-reactivity to lotions and oil.

thumbby invention

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Katherine: I made what turned into my first prototype to use personally and showed it to friends, including an LMT who became my business partner.

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

Katherine: I made a prototype for personal use – later I produced some 3D CAD drawings with a software package called SolidView and had a 3D printer print the drawing in thermoset plastic resin.

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Katherine: Yes, we went to an intellectual property attorney, who guided us through the patent application process.

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Katherine: I think we always really wanted to manufacture the Thumbby™ ourselves – we did look at a contract manufacturer but not into licensing.

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

Katherine: We’re self-funded, and still make our product in-house.

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

Katherine: Video has been very important for us, because describing how something feels doesn’t have nearly the impact of seeing someone react to how it feels to them. Reading “It feels great!” is one thing – seeing someone say “Oh My God, where can I *get *one of these?” is quite another.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3L_-5WoZBTc

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

Katherine: I think the biggest challenge for me, like many other engineers, has been with marketing. What has been very important is having a partner who is familiar with our target market, credible as a spokesperson and talented at marketing and sales.

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Katherine: About two years.

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Katherine: I think I would have been thinking from the beginning of a product that we would be producing hundreds of a day, instead of a few at a time. At the time I had no idea how big an impact a small design change can make on ease of manufacture – and the larger the number of units you’re making the more important easy manufacturing gets. It will also impact your costs down the line if you make your design as easy to manufacture as you can.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Katherine: Imagine the kind of people you think would really love using your invention, go find some to talk to about it, and really listen to what they say. You can hire this out, but it’s easy to chat people up about a product idea if you have something to play show and tell with. We made several design changes in our product and packaging early on to address comments from those conversations we had with potential customers.

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

Katherine: Please visit us at http://www.thumbby.com.

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Interview with Lisa Illman about her Invention Kritter Kondo

Lisa Illman with her invention Kritter KondoIn this inventor interview Lisa Illman talks about how she developed her invention the Kritter Kondo pet enclosure.

Tara: What is your name, invention name and website URL?

Lisa: Lisa Illman, Kritter Kondo, www.kritterkommunity.com

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Lisa: Philadelphia – I live in the city and had two (I now have one) kitty cats that I adore.  I wanted them to come outside with me and hang out in our courtyard when we moved into the condo I live in, but the iron gate surrounding our courtyard was not secure enough for them to stay inside.  They could slip right under and out into the busy street.  I began sketching different houses and playpens I thought would work for them and in addition me!  I did not want to have to build anything or store large pens, so I designed a playpen that collapses flat, and is just one piece for easy set up.  The Kritter Kondo also comes with a carrying case so I can slip it right under my bed in the winter time.

Kitter Condo Pet enclosure

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Lisa: I hired an Engineering Firm to draft the drawings for me and work on some of the technical aspects.

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

Lisa: Yes, I got presentation drawings (CAD Drawings) from the Engineering firm.  If a person is so inclined to do so, drawings can be easily created with an Architectural Software.  Google Sketch is free and classes can be taken in various cities for a small fee.

Kritter Kondo Invention with Dog

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Lisa: Yes, I hired a Patent Attorney and I have a pending patent.  This is another area many Inventors can save quite a bit of money by writing their own patent.  My strengths lie more with Sales, Marketing and PR so I hired out some of my deficiencies.  I have learned a lot from the experts though, and feel more confident about doing my own in the future.

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Lisa: I love sales and marketing and growing my business, so I always new I would have my own product line.  Maybe someday it will be licensed too, but for now my baby will grow with me.

Kitter Kondo Invention in Green

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

Lisa: I first tried and tried to have it manufactured in the USA, but it was impossible to find a Manufacturer that could and would.  I then went to an online site called Aliaba.com and received a host of quotes.  I work with two manufacturers now in China and am very happy with both.  We use email (Google Translation is fantastic for language barriers) and we Skype regularly.  It has been a very good experience for me.

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

Lisa: Social Media and PR. Social Media has been a good friend to me and Kritter Kommunity.  It is free and word of mouth is still one of the best ways to grow sales.  Twitter is great for the pet community and I am a very active Tweeter @lisaillman.  My cat even has her own Twitter account (@KritterKondo)!  Also pitching to magazine Editors and T.V. Producers.  The Kritter Kondo has found it’s way on the Good Morning America Show, been written up in the Chicago Times and will be in May 2012 edition of Cat Fancy.  All of this exposure is a direct result of PR.  I do my own and the Editors and Producers really seem to like that.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

Lisa: The hardest part was getting orders out while still working a full time job.  I still do the majority of the work but now have a warehouse that is staffed with helpers.  When I first started, I rented a storage unit and drove to it in the mornings to tape labels on my packages, then drop them off at the local FedEx.  Eventually I was able to persuade FedEx to pick the boxes up directly from the facility which was helpful.  And then last year, I moved into a real warehouse that has it’s own Warehouse Manager.  Starting up is difficult, but well worth the work!

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wU5Xx7m_ePU

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Lisa: I thought of the idea and eight months later had the prototype with drawings.  I new I wanted to do this, and when I make my mind up, I just keep going until it’s done.

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Lisa: Yes, many things!  You only learn from starting though, so I would change a thing.  With my next invention, I would be more precise about costs and overhead.  Manufacturing costs should not be more than 30% or so of Suggest Retail Price, so honing in on that in the beginning is key  to creating a strong business plan.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Lisa: I would say make sure your invention fills a need or is a solution to a problem.  It is much easier to sell a product or service to people saying “What a great idea, why didn’t I think of that!”

Tara: Where can people find out more about you and your product

www.kritterkommunity.com
www.krittersthattwitter.com
@KritterKondo
@lisaillman

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Interview with Tobi Kosanke about her Inventions which help Animals

In this inventor interview Tobi Kosanke shares her story of creating inventions to help animals.

Tara: Your name, invention name and website URL?

Tobi Kosanke animal products inventorTobi: Tobi Kosanke, Inventions: Kitty Holster, Avian Haven hut, Hen Saver, Hen Holster and Birdy Bra
Websites: www.crazykfarm.com and www.kittyholster.com, www.hensaver.com, www.AvianHavenHut.com

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Tobi: I did not start out with the goal of becoming an entrepreneur. A scientist by trade, I’m a prime example of the saying “Necessity is the mother of invention.” I really loved my job as a geologist in the petroleum industry and the flexible work schedule that I had. My former bosses were always very accommodating when it came to taking care of my special needs daughter and for five years I was able to balance a successful career with meeting the needs of my daughter. Then a new manager, who did not believe in telecommuting, forced me to make a decision: care for my daughter at home or return to the office. It was a no-brainer: I chose my daughter. and found myself facing the financial burden of taking unpaid leave from my job.

bird invention My husband and I own and operate a 35-acre working farm called Crazy K Farm, which is located in Hempstead, Texas. Our farm is home to more than 100 chickens, 25 geese, 30 ducks, four sheep, 12 goats, four horses, two donkeys, three livestock guardian dogs, two barn cats, three indoor cats,three indoor dogs, four parrots and a red golden pheasant. Nearly all of our animals are rescues and I have spent the past several years creating products to improve the quality of their lives. When covering the farm bills while staying home to care for my daughter became almost impossible, food and medical needs for 200+ mouths inspired me to form a new division of Crazy K Farm — Crazy K Farm Pet and Poultry Products, LLC — and market my unique inventions.

All of my patented and patent-pending products (Kitty Holster, Avian Haven hut, Hen Saver, Hen Holster and Birdy Bra) have gotten enthusiastic positive feedback from consumers who have purchased them. I have received numerous unsolicited letters and e-mails from people who love the quality and functionality of my products. I began selling direct to consumers through my websites and on EBAY and recently started advertising in consumer special-interest magazines (such as Bird Talk, Hobby Farms. Cat Fancy and Backyard Poultry) and marketing to pet stores through trade-show exhibition and Pet Industry publications (such as Pet Business).

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Tobi: I invent products to improve the quality of animals lives. My first invention, the Hen Saver, I created to protect hens from roosters, other hens (pecking order) and predators (from the sky.)

bird invention hen saver alternative to hen apron

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Tobi: Hiring a seamstress to sew my design, filing for a patent, and then selling it on EBay.

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Tobi: Yes. Through LegalZoom at first (for the Hen Saver) and then I learned enough from that experience to write the provisional patents myself (saved me tens of thousands of dollars in the end) and then handing the provisional to a patent attorney to complete the process.

cat harness invention

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Tobi: I only recently considered licensing in order to reach a broader market. I have been approached many times and am considering one non-exclusive licensing term.

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

Tobi: Via the internet. I found only one manufacturer that was willing to make the prototypes for free in order to woo my business. They were much higher quality than the ones I had to pay for. I self funded my first run through credit cards and loans.

hen invention

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

Tobi: Ads in niche magazines and free publicity through media coverage.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

Tobi: Funding. I can’t believe how expensive it is.

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Tobi: Months – well under one year.

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Tobi: Yes – hire a professional designer for website and packaging. This was a big lesson as I think my home-made designs turned retailers off. I more professional look would have paid off in spades.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Tobi: Patent first, market second. Protect your idea!

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

Tobi: Websites: www.crazykfarm.com and www.kittyholster.com, www.hensaver.com, www.AvianHavenHut.com

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com