Inventor Offers his Tips on Marketing your Invention

John McKee the co inventor of Cosmo Finger GuardJohn McKee – one of the inventors and co-founders of The Original Cosmo Finger Guard dropped me an email and asked if I would be interested in him sharing an update on how they have been getting the word out about their invention. In brief the Cosmo Finger Guard is an invention created to stop Hair Stylists getting cuts on their fingers while working, but you can read their full interview here. Here’s John’s update and marketing tips to help fellow inventors.

Cosmetology Finger Guard Marketing Update

Written by John McKee – Co-Founder/Inventor The Original Cosmo Finger Guard www.cosmofingerguard.com

It has been 8 months since we released our update in your last blog. We thought it would be helpful and useful to others aspiring to become an inventor to share our progress. It has been a long journey and we still have a lot to do.

cosmo finger guard invention for hair stylists

A focus on social networking and surrounding ourselves with industry contacts

We have placed all our focus on social networking and surrounding ourselves with industry contacts from professional hairstylists to salon owners and business executives who focus on the Cosmetology world. It is very time consuming but an absolute must. We use Facebook, Twitter and You Tube almost exclusively and it is a part time job. If you’re going to use these social networks you have to maintain them and keep the content fresh and relevant.

Facebook

We do promote give-a-ways on Facebook to keep the interactions exciting.

Twitter

We use Twitter quotes and get permission to post them and re Tweet when Hairstylist Tweet about cutting and slashing their fingers at the salon with shears. We use Twitter alongside hair shows we are not able to attend and use hash tags to interact and get noticed and gain followers.  We do the same with popular TV Shows like SharkTank and Tabatha Takes Over. Although the TV show SharkTank is not our direct audience; Tabatha takes Over is. We do fall into the inventing category and we are always keeping our eye open for an investor to help us move to the next level.

Video

We even made a video out of consolidated tweets and it is amazing.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0MFdYy4BMa8&feature=plcp

All these things are FREE. You cannot beat it if you’re willing to put the time in. It truly has been worth it. Consistency has been the key.

Next level to increase inventory

The next level for us is to increase our inventory with larger quantities which give us a better margin and add retail packaging and UPC codes for major beauty supply retailers. Today we still strictly sell directly to the consumer via our web site.

Keywords drive targetted traffic to the website

We have been fortunate to have a great web design team that knows SEO (Search Engine Optimization). We home in on keywords for search engines like Google because we want to rank high on terms like our name: Cosmo Finger Guard or terms such as cut resistant Cosmetology glove, finger cut protection, etc. Today we rank at the top. Of course we are the only available option today for Cosmetologists to help prevent finger cuts.

Partnering with industry related businesses

I mentioned earlier we also partnered with industry related businesses like AskASalon.com and we are featured through them online and they also attend trade shows like the IBS in Las Vegas (International Beauty Show) where they will attend and make rounds showing off the CosmoGlove. This is key exposure for us.

Attending Trade Shows

We did attend our first trade show earlier in the year in Des Moines, IA  called CBI (The Cosmetologists and Barbers of Iowa) which is a regional hair show and we sold about 12 % of the walk through traffic. It showed us that face to face selling for a new product works and it was fairly inexpensive. We highly recommend local shows if you can put into your budget.

Web Sales

Our web sales have more than quadrupled over 2011. We have sold CosmoGloves in just about every state in the U.S. We recently made our first few sales in the United Kingdom.

Magazine Exposure

We were featured in the 2012 May issue of Inventors Digest and interact with just about all online companies in the inventing arena.

Plans for the future

Our plans from here are to remain consistent with our efforts, maintain fresh and relevant content and review all customer comments and feedback for improvements. We are looking for investors and distribution partners to help us grow. We know trying to do everything alone is impossible. We will continue to interact with other inventors and seek their advice and we hope that we may have been of some help to anyone thinking about inventing a new product. Surround yourself with good trustworthy people and bury yourself deep into making sure your idea becomes a reality.

Persistence and absolute dedication it is the key.

WEB: www.cosmofingerguard.com
FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/CosmoFingerGuard
TWITTER: http://twitter.com/CosmoGlove
YOUTUBE: http://www.youtube.com/user/cosmofingerguard

 

The Invention of Thumbby an Interview with the Inventor Katherine Wolfe

Katherine Wolfe Inventor of ThumbbyAn inventor interview with inventor Katherine Wolfe who created who created the Thumbby™ Soft Massage Cone

Tara: What is Your name, invention name and website URL?

Katherine: I’m Katherine Wolfe, my invention is called the Thumbby™ Soft Massage Cone, and our website is at http://www.thumbby.com

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Katherine: Our company is based in Portland, Or. I am a software engineer with an interest in massage and bodywork because of chronic pain issues. I started inventing because I needed a massage tool that was comfortable for me to use.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Katherine: The Thumbby™Massage Cone is a massage tool made of soft silicone rubber, that’s shaped like a cone with a rounded tip. It feels like a thumb and magnifies force, so it helps anyone give deep massage regardless of hand strength. I invented the Thumbby™ because I lost strength in my hands from a congenital spinal problem and so couldn’t massage people well. Hard massage tools were uncomfortable both for me and the people I was trying to massage, so I made a kind of rounded cone out of clay, then made a mold of it in hard plastic and experimented with various materials to find the right “feel”. Silicone gave us what we were looking for in a material because of its natural feel and non-reactivity to lotions and oil.

thumbby invention

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Katherine: I made what turned into my first prototype to use personally and showed it to friends, including an LMT who became my business partner.

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

Katherine: I made a prototype for personal use – later I produced some 3D CAD drawings with a software package called SolidView and had a 3D printer print the drawing in thermoset plastic resin.

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Katherine: Yes, we went to an intellectual property attorney, who guided us through the patent application process.

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Katherine: I think we always really wanted to manufacture the Thumbby™ ourselves – we did look at a contract manufacturer but not into licensing.

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

Katherine: We’re self-funded, and still make our product in-house.

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

Katherine: Video has been very important for us, because describing how something feels doesn’t have nearly the impact of seeing someone react to how it feels to them. Reading “It feels great!” is one thing – seeing someone say “Oh My God, where can I *get *one of these?” is quite another.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3L_-5WoZBTc

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

Katherine: I think the biggest challenge for me, like many other engineers, has been with marketing. What has been very important is having a partner who is familiar with our target market, credible as a spokesperson and talented at marketing and sales.

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Katherine: About two years.

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Katherine: I think I would have been thinking from the beginning of a product that we would be producing hundreds of a day, instead of a few at a time. At the time I had no idea how big an impact a small design change can make on ease of manufacture – and the larger the number of units you’re making the more important easy manufacturing gets. It will also impact your costs down the line if you make your design as easy to manufacture as you can.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Katherine: Imagine the kind of people you think would really love using your invention, go find some to talk to about it, and really listen to what they say. You can hire this out, but it’s easy to chat people up about a product idea if you have something to play show and tell with. We made several design changes in our product and packaging early on to address comments from those conversations we had with potential customers.

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

Katherine: Please visit us at http://www.thumbby.com.

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Interview with Lisa Illman about her Invention Kritter Kondo

Lisa Illman with her invention Kritter KondoIn this inventor interview Lisa Illman talks about how she developed her invention the Kritter Kondo pet enclosure.

Tara: What is your name, invention name and website URL?

Lisa: Lisa Illman, Kritter Kondo, www.kritterkommunity.com

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Lisa: Philadelphia – I live in the city and had two (I now have one) kitty cats that I adore.  I wanted them to come outside with me and hang out in our courtyard when we moved into the condo I live in, but the iron gate surrounding our courtyard was not secure enough for them to stay inside.  They could slip right under and out into the busy street.  I began sketching different houses and playpens I thought would work for them and in addition me!  I did not want to have to build anything or store large pens, so I designed a playpen that collapses flat, and is just one piece for easy set up.  The Kritter Kondo also comes with a carrying case so I can slip it right under my bed in the winter time.

Kitter Condo Pet enclosure

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Lisa: I hired an Engineering Firm to draft the drawings for me and work on some of the technical aspects.

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

Lisa: Yes, I got presentation drawings (CAD Drawings) from the Engineering firm.  If a person is so inclined to do so, drawings can be easily created with an Architectural Software.  Google Sketch is free and classes can be taken in various cities for a small fee.

Kritter Kondo Invention with Dog

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Lisa: Yes, I hired a Patent Attorney and I have a pending patent.  This is another area many Inventors can save quite a bit of money by writing their own patent.  My strengths lie more with Sales, Marketing and PR so I hired out some of my deficiencies.  I have learned a lot from the experts though, and feel more confident about doing my own in the future.

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Lisa: I love sales and marketing and growing my business, so I always new I would have my own product line.  Maybe someday it will be licensed too, but for now my baby will grow with me.

Kitter Kondo Invention in Green

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

Lisa: I first tried and tried to have it manufactured in the USA, but it was impossible to find a Manufacturer that could and would.  I then went to an online site called Aliaba.com and received a host of quotes.  I work with two manufacturers now in China and am very happy with both.  We use email (Google Translation is fantastic for language barriers) and we Skype regularly.  It has been a very good experience for me.

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

Lisa: Social Media and PR. Social Media has been a good friend to me and Kritter Kommunity.  It is free and word of mouth is still one of the best ways to grow sales.  Twitter is great for the pet community and I am a very active Tweeter @lisaillman.  My cat even has her own Twitter account (@KritterKondo)!  Also pitching to magazine Editors and T.V. Producers.  The Kritter Kondo has found it’s way on the Good Morning America Show, been written up in the Chicago Times and will be in May 2012 edition of Cat Fancy.  All of this exposure is a direct result of PR.  I do my own and the Editors and Producers really seem to like that.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

Lisa: The hardest part was getting orders out while still working a full time job.  I still do the majority of the work but now have a warehouse that is staffed with helpers.  When I first started, I rented a storage unit and drove to it in the mornings to tape labels on my packages, then drop them off at the local FedEx.  Eventually I was able to persuade FedEx to pick the boxes up directly from the facility which was helpful.  And then last year, I moved into a real warehouse that has it’s own Warehouse Manager.  Starting up is difficult, but well worth the work!

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wU5Xx7m_ePU

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Lisa: I thought of the idea and eight months later had the prototype with drawings.  I new I wanted to do this, and when I make my mind up, I just keep going until it’s done.

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Lisa: Yes, many things!  You only learn from starting though, so I would change a thing.  With my next invention, I would be more precise about costs and overhead.  Manufacturing costs should not be more than 30% or so of Suggest Retail Price, so honing in on that in the beginning is key  to creating a strong business plan.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Lisa: I would say make sure your invention fills a need or is a solution to a problem.  It is much easier to sell a product or service to people saying “What a great idea, why didn’t I think of that!”

Tara: Where can people find out more about you and your product

www.kritterkommunity.com
www.krittersthattwitter.com
@KritterKondo
@lisaillman

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Interview with Russ Cohn Inventor of NatureMill Automatic Compost Bin

Russ Cohn Inventor of NatureMill automatic ComposterIn this inventor interview Russ Cohn explains how he came up with the idea for his invention the NatureMill automatic compost bin and the steps he took to bring his invention to market.

Tara: What’s your name and Invention URL

Russ: NatureMill, Inc inventor Russ Cohn, website www.naturemill.com.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Russ: I am based in San Francisco. My background is in management consulting for big boring companies, although I got a few engineering degrees from MIT long ago.

compost bin inventionTara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Russ: The invention is the NatureMill automatic compost bin. I came up with the idea by composting the “old fashioned” way with a big pile in my backyard and decided there must be a better (geekier) way to make compost.

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Russ: I started with a “frankenstein prototype” which is a very crude and fast model that actually works but isn’t pretty. Usually they are made in the garage and/or kitchen. It’s a great way to test an idea. It make one great batch of compost – and I still have it!

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

Russ: I made most of the prototypes myself. Then I worked with a mechanical engineer to make professional drawings of each component for our suppliers to build from.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fly1WI6qOUE

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Russ: Don’t get me started! A lawyer friend helped me file a patent immediately (a preliminary patent application actually, a “PPA” as it’s called). Now years later we only JUST got that patent approved and our official patent number issued just this month! It took may years of waiting around for the US Patent and Trademark Office. Our tax dollars at work. They had all sorts of objections and completely and rudely rejected every claim in our patent many times. According to our lawyers this is standard process. You have to go back and forth with the patent office until everyone is tired out and just agrees. Kind of like haggling for trinkets at some sort of third world market. The lawyers and patent examiner are getting paid the whole time of course – and not small change either. It’s very traumatic and expensive for the first time entrepreneur. We figured out a few ways to shorten the process and we have since gotten two additional patents approved.

compost invention

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Russ: Yes we started manufacturing in my basement and kitchen. I was single then with a very old/un-remodeled kitchen. That all changed after the wedding and things got out of hand quick! We also outgrew the kitchen. At one point we had three employees in the house, my wife was home sick in bed, I was on a call with a big client, the UPS man arrived, and the dog started barking uncontrollably. Probably a few phones were ringing at the same time. So we found a company in Wisconsin to manufacture for us. It worked out well for everyone. We are now considering licensing for some of our international business but that is still in the early stages.

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

Russ: Long story. Initially we were referred to a very large plastics molder, who said they could also do the assembly and shipping of our whole product. Turns out, that was their salesman taking and once they had our order they decided they couldn’t do any of the assembly after all. So we scrambled to find a factory nearby to do the assembly. We stumbled upon a nearby company that had just been downsized when their main business was sent to China. We stuck with them for many years. So it all worked out in the end.

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

Russ: TV. For all the hype of the internet and the “cloud” we are still a nation of couch potatoes. TV is the best way to get the message across because it is visual, engaging, entertaining, and pervasive. We were fortunate enough to be featured on the Discovery Channel, History Channel, and cameo appearances on Oprah, New Adventures of Old Christine, Big Bang Theory, and a few others. Mostly it was luck but probably the other smaller appearances helped in blogs and traditional print media. I think today most of our actual sales are through word of mouth. Customers love our product and they brag about it to their friends.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

Russ: Suppliers. Unfortunately many of them are struggling or going out of business. We have a “Made in the USA” strategy which is very difficult to maintain these days. Sometimes components arrive late or incomplete, or the quality starts to suffer. But we have a very loyal and dedicated group of core suppliers now so we think the worst is behind us.

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Russ: Every product launch we’ve ever launched took about a year. Even the little add-on accessories. Turns out, that is the minimum for just about any product in the world. It can take a lot longer if there are regulatory issues or new technologies or materials to develop.

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Russ: What I learned is the invention process is the easy part. The product launch process (including testing, suppliers, marketing, etc.) is extremely slow and difficult. If I were to do it all over again, I would probably quit in month two and just get a regular job. Seriously, it’s a long and painful process. Licensing doesn’t help much because nobody will believe in you until you make the product a big success.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Russ: Don’t do it! Unless you are extremely passionate about your idea, don’t need any income for a long time, and can handle rejection and frustration. For me the motivation was saving the planet with a really great environmental invention. We are literally saving the Earth every day. That kept us going in the early days and sustains us still to this day.

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

Russ: www.naturemill.com – and also our product has been in Home Depot, Amazon, Lowes, Williams-Sonoma, and a few other places.

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Interview with Tobi Kosanke about her Inventions which help Animals

In this inventor interview Tobi Kosanke shares her story of creating inventions to help animals.

Tara: Your name, invention name and website URL?

Tobi Kosanke animal products inventorTobi: Tobi Kosanke, Inventions: Kitty Holster, Avian Haven hut, Hen Saver, Hen Holster and Birdy Bra
Websites: www.crazykfarm.com and www.kittyholster.com, www.hensaver.com, www.AvianHavenHut.com

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Tobi: I did not start out with the goal of becoming an entrepreneur. A scientist by trade, I’m a prime example of the saying “Necessity is the mother of invention.” I really loved my job as a geologist in the petroleum industry and the flexible work schedule that I had. My former bosses were always very accommodating when it came to taking care of my special needs daughter and for five years I was able to balance a successful career with meeting the needs of my daughter. Then a new manager, who did not believe in telecommuting, forced me to make a decision: care for my daughter at home or return to the office. It was a no-brainer: I chose my daughter. and found myself facing the financial burden of taking unpaid leave from my job.

bird invention My husband and I own and operate a 35-acre working farm called Crazy K Farm, which is located in Hempstead, Texas. Our farm is home to more than 100 chickens, 25 geese, 30 ducks, four sheep, 12 goats, four horses, two donkeys, three livestock guardian dogs, two barn cats, three indoor cats,three indoor dogs, four parrots and a red golden pheasant. Nearly all of our animals are rescues and I have spent the past several years creating products to improve the quality of their lives. When covering the farm bills while staying home to care for my daughter became almost impossible, food and medical needs for 200+ mouths inspired me to form a new division of Crazy K Farm — Crazy K Farm Pet and Poultry Products, LLC — and market my unique inventions.

All of my patented and patent-pending products (Kitty Holster, Avian Haven hut, Hen Saver, Hen Holster and Birdy Bra) have gotten enthusiastic positive feedback from consumers who have purchased them. I have received numerous unsolicited letters and e-mails from people who love the quality and functionality of my products. I began selling direct to consumers through my websites and on EBAY and recently started advertising in consumer special-interest magazines (such as Bird Talk, Hobby Farms. Cat Fancy and Backyard Poultry) and marketing to pet stores through trade-show exhibition and Pet Industry publications (such as Pet Business).

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Tobi: I invent products to improve the quality of animals lives. My first invention, the Hen Saver, I created to protect hens from roosters, other hens (pecking order) and predators (from the sky.)

bird invention hen saver alternative to hen apron

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Tobi: Hiring a seamstress to sew my design, filing for a patent, and then selling it on EBay.

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Tobi: Yes. Through LegalZoom at first (for the Hen Saver) and then I learned enough from that experience to write the provisional patents myself (saved me tens of thousands of dollars in the end) and then handing the provisional to a patent attorney to complete the process.

cat harness invention

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Tobi: I only recently considered licensing in order to reach a broader market. I have been approached many times and am considering one non-exclusive licensing term.

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

Tobi: Via the internet. I found only one manufacturer that was willing to make the prototypes for free in order to woo my business. They were much higher quality than the ones I had to pay for. I self funded my first run through credit cards and loans.

hen invention

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

Tobi: Ads in niche magazines and free publicity through media coverage.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

Tobi: Funding. I can’t believe how expensive it is.

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Tobi: Months – well under one year.

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Tobi: Yes – hire a professional designer for website and packaging. This was a big lesson as I think my home-made designs turned retailers off. I more professional look would have paid off in spades.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Tobi: Patent first, market second. Protect your idea!

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

Tobi: Websites: www.crazykfarm.com and www.kittyholster.com, www.hensaver.com, www.AvianHavenHut.com

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Interview with Sandra Frawley about her Invention SeatPak

Sandra Frawley with her SeatPak InventionIn this inventor interview Sandra Frawley, inventor of SeatPak, talks about how she came up with her invention idea after struggling to carry a child’s car seat, hold her son’s hand and hold a diaper bag and coat all at the same time. The SeatPak was her solution to the problem for busy moms on the go.

Tara: Your name, invention name and website URL?

Sandra: Sandra Frawley, 

SeatPak – www.babybindle.com

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are
based, your background experience how you first started 
inventing?

Sandra: 



I am based out of New York. I have been a stay at home mom since the birth 
of my son in 2004, before that I was a Registered Veterinary Technician. I
 have thought of ideas, but never followed through or saw them on the market
 already after doing a search.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention,
what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Seat Pack InventionSandra: I invented the SeatPak, a mini diaper bag that attaches to the handle of an 
infant car seat, stroller, luggage and more. After the birth of my daughter
 in 2009, I was carrying the car seat, struggling with a coat and a diaper bag
 while trying to keep a hold of my son’s hand. I realized during my errands 
that my daughter was napping and I didn’t need to carry the big diaper bag.
 I started slipping my keys, phone and wallet between her legs and the seat.
Then I went down to just carrying keys phone and a credit card in my pockets 
after losing my wallet a couple of times. On a trip back home after an
 errand I was thinking of my dilemma and that if only I could find a little
bag that would attach to the handle of the car seat to put my things in
 while I shopped. After searching the net and finding nothing that solved my
problem I sat and sketched a couple of ideas, made a few prototypes and knew
that I couldn’t be the only mom out there with this problem.

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Sandra: Well, I shelved the idea for about 5 months, I had no funding and didn’t
want to go into debt bringing the SeatPak to market. In June of 2010 I saw
a Facebook post about someone who had entered the Huggies Mom Inspired Grant
 competition. Thinking I couldn’t really lose anything I entered, forgot
 about it until a month later when the director of the program called to tell
 me I was one of the winners chosen to receive a $15,000 grant to develop my
 invention

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42j4Cz9D-kQ

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a
 prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

Sandra: I had already made the prototype, so I took those to a manufacturer who then
 was able to produce a more professional prototype

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and
how did you go about it?

Sandra: I did. I had a provisional patent done which lasted one year, which then I 
had turned into a utility patent

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself
or did you look into licensing the idea?

Sandra: I always intended to manufacture my idea

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your
invention and did you self fund this?

Sandra: 
I attended a trade show which put me in contact with a few manufacturers.
The funding came from the grant

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your
invention?

Sandra: Facebook, Twitter, Giveaways and getting write ups.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your 
invention to market?

Sandra: It is a hard road! I would do it again in a heartbeat. Getting into retail 
is very hard. It is very competitive out there for shelf space. Getting
 your name out there so that people know your product exists is very tough as
 well

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to
 market?

Sandra: About a year and a half

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that 
you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Sandra: I think I would have allocated a little more in my budget for advertising

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an 
idea?

Sandra: The road I have taken has led me to what I know today and what I need to
 succeed going forward. Learn from your mistakes, don’t get hung up on them,
 but move on knowing there was a lesson to be learned from them in order to
take the next step that will move you forward.

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

Sandra: 

On my website at www.babybindle.com

Twitter: @babybindle
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Babybindle/157816857564459

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com