Interview with Matt Butler about his Invention a Game Called Rollors

Matt Butler Rollors InventorIn this inventor interview Matt Butler talks through his story of creating the game Rollors, which combines Bocce Ball, Horseshoes, and Bowling

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Matt: I’m living in Dayton, Ohio attending a school called the Air Force Institute of Technology. Dayton is a hub for innovation and is where the Wright Brother’s started flying their airplane.  As for me, this is my first invention. I have another one in prototype status and I’m researching the intellectual property perspective of the game.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about Rollors, what it is and how you came up with the idea?

Matt: I created the new award winning game called Rollors. Think of Rollors as a game that combines the fun of Bocce Ball, Horseshoes, and Bowling. There are both the elements of skill and chance to Rollors. The homepage for the game is www.rollors.net

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Matt: Researching if there was already an idea like Rollors in the public domain. I did that by researching what was on the shelves of stores, searching the Internet and using the various patent search sites online.

Rollors Game invention

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Matt: Yes. I have one utility patent that’s been approved and a couple more pending (one of which is international). After I completed the step above I looked up local patent attorneys and read a couple books on patents.

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of Rollors?

Matt: Yes. I used the drawing sheets from my first patent for the drawing sheets. Another thing I did I would recommend is research any local schools that might have any type of CAD classes or prototyping machines.

Tara: Have you licensed Rollors to a toy company or are you manufacturing and selling it yourself, and why?

Matt: Yes, I’ve licensed the game to another game company in the US. I did it so they could bring Rollors to a new level that I wasn’t able to do since I have another job. I’m now searching for international distribution and/or licensing opportunities for Rollors.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SKMieatidwA&feature=plcp

Tara: What have you found are the most successful ways of promoting Rollors?

Matt: I would say persistence, persistence, and more persistence. What keep my persistence going is getting great feedback and testimonials from people about their Rollors experience. They’ve all been very positive which in turn feeds the fire for my persistence.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing Rollors to market?

Matt: The most difficult part is spreading the word about the game. I’m always thinking up new innovative ways via blogs, gift guides, review sites, press releases, social media, etc.

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Matt: The idea started to “roll” around in my head back in 2008 but I did a lot of researching into how I can keep my game protected through patent protection. When the first patent filed then I could start developing the website and spreading the word about the game.

Rollors Toy Invention

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing Rollors that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Matt: Yes. This may sound like a minor thing but I think every tidbit of information that is shared with future inventors helps them so they don’t recreate the same thing (if it’s negative). When I first started out I had custom letterhead and envelopes created with the Rollors graphic on it with my mailing address. Since I’m in the military I move around more than the usually person so that was not money well spent.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Use the all the very valuable resources that are out there like the inventors websites, blogs, listen radio shows like Got Invention radio or magazines like Inventors Digest.

Tara: Where can people find out more about you and your game Rollors?

Matt:
FB:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Rollors/254952007893704
Twitter: 
http://twitter.com/#!/rollors
Website:
www.rollors.net

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Interview with Inventor Rick Hopper Creator of ReadeREST for Reading Glasses Wearers

I found this inventor interview really interesting as Rick Hopper from www.ReadeREST.com found out that his invention idea had already been patented. However he did not let this stop him pursuing the idea. Read Rick’s story to find out more below.

Rick Hopper with his readerest invention

Tara: What is your name, invention name and website URL?

Rick: Inventor Rick Hopper, Company: ReadeREST. (Pronounced Reader Rest) www.ReadeREST.com (We are also known as SpecSecure by ReadeREST. *SpecSecure was a more recognizable name in the international market)

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Rick: I grew up near Anaheim and now live in Fullerton, Calif. As a young boy, I loved tinkering around with things including tools or anything else I could get my hands on. My first invention, believe it or not, was a “wind sail” for my skate board. I used pvc pipe and a sheet to create a sail that could help me pick up speed or slow down while riding my skate board down hills. I’ve always considered myself pretty inventive. If there was a problem, I’d find a solution!

I worked at Home Depot for many years and as a carpenter on the side to support my family, but always had bigger dreams for myself. I started up a business from an idea I’d had about 12 years ago (Vinyl Trim for window companies) and was fortunate enough to sell the company and focus on my next project. The bigger picture; which was ReadeREST.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Readerest invention coloursRick: The day I turned 40, I started needing reading glasses. When I wasn’t wearing them, I’d hang them in my shirt collar and they would always, without fail, fall on the ground and get scratched. Even worse, sometimes they’d fall in the toilet! I’d try wearing them on my head and they’d pull my hair out. I wasn’t about to wear a “granny chain” so I needed something to keep them within arm’s reach, but also safe. I began bending paper clips into different shapes and attaching them with magnets to my shirt. It made the perfect hanger for my glasses. Everywhere I went, people would ask “Hey, What is that??” and more importantly “Where can I get one??” It didn’t take long to see that there was a huge demand for this product. With some fine tuning of the shape and design, ReadeREST was born. Like my company before, it began in my garage! I started making them for all my friends and family and eventually started selling them.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8-UcONEYDk

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Rick: (Somewhat discussed above) I bought better, stronger magnets, and designed a streamline shape that anyone could wear. If I got stuck, I just kept moving forward, gathering information from anyone I could. That’s the thing about being an entrepreneur, you might now know what the heck you’re doing, but you figure it out!

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

Rick: The first prototype was literally made out of paper clips. It seems silly to think back on that from where we are now, but that’s how the basic idea came about. The idea was so simple. It was just solving a problem I had with trying to keep my glasses safe and turned into something so much bigger.

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Rick: I immediately, after seeing people’s reaction to it, searched for a utility patent to protect this cool idea. To my surprise, it already existed! I found out it belonged to an older gentleman who had passed away. His wife lived in Northern Calif. So I took a road trip and purchased the patent from her.

Tara:  Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Rick: I definitely wanted a Made In America product and if I could keep up with the demand, I wanted to manufacture it here, myself. We now have a warehouse in Brea, Calif. We make and assemble each one by hand and to tell you the truth, you can’t make them cheaper in China! We have a fluid system down that is efficient and employs hard working Americans, which is great. Our “blinged” version that is embedded with Swarovski crystals are all assembled by hand as well!

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

Rick: The money I made off the sale of my other business was all I needed. Like any successful venture, there are many players on the team. Surrounding yourself with the right people is key. I was able to find a local metal guy that created my stainless steel front clips and back plates. I experimented with all sizes and strengths of magnets, found the most powerful adhesive available, and got to work assembling them!

Tara:  What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

readarest glasses inventionRick: We really got our big break after I was selected to be featured on ABC’s hit show Shark Tank. I frankly had never heard of the show, but everyone told me I needed to apply to be on it! So, I went to the ABC website and submitted my idea. A few weeks later, I was selected. The episode aired in February of 2011 and that is really what launched us in a big way. Making a deal with Lori Greiner was the best thing we could have done. Another great avenue that has helped us is attending trade shows, such as, Gift Expos and Vision Expo. You can make priceless contacts at these events.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

Rick: If you have the right product, at the right time, at the right price, there is nothing difficult about it. Don’t get me wrong, it takes a LOT of work getting your product to retail, but with an invention that is a clear winner, people will see its potential and believe in it 100%.

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Rick: 2 years of constant follow through and long days!

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Rick: I believe you learn new things all along the way. You’ll make mistakes and learn from them as in any part of life. I don’t think I’d do anything differently.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Rick: Words I live by: Ideas are worth a penny, but the action and plans that carry your idea to reality are worth millions. It’s not enough to just have a cool idea. You have to be willing to put in the time and energy to make your idea a reality. There are so many resources at your finger tips these days, there is no excuse to sit around with a brilliant idea. Go after it with all your heart and soul!

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention

Rick: We have a website www.ReadeREST.com where you can see all of the different ReadeRESTS. It began with the simple stainless steel option and has evolved into other colors and shapes now!

We have a fun facebook page called SpecSecure. www.Facebook.com/SpecSecure and a twitter account @SpecSecure

There have been a few articles written about Rick and ReadeREST too.
http://www.ocregister.com/articles/hopper-344773-glasses-tank.html
http://newmediaradiohour.com/rick-hopper-creator-of-readerrest-by-specsecure/

Terron Sommerville Shares his Story of Inventing the Power Tablet Charger

Terron Sommerville  Inventor or Power Tablet ChargerIn this inventor interview Terron Sommerville describes how he got inspiration to create his invention the Power Tablet Charger which is portable power for phones, GPS, tablets and cameras.

Tara: What is your name, invention name and website URL?

Terron: my name is Terron Sommerville. Our company website is www.solarvillecommunications.com Our company specializes in Solar/Renewable Energy products for daily consumer use in the market. My latest invention is called the “Power Tablet Charger

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Terron: I’m based out of and from Newark,New Jersey. After being in the military for a number of years and traveling around the world,this was one of my motivations on becoming an inventor. One day back 2002 I found my self stranded one day and my cell phone battery died on me. I had no way to call anyone,because my cell phone died. So I was stranded with no way to communicate to anyone for help. My cell phone battery was dead,car stopped on me,it was hot,just an all around bad day. Eventually about 6 hours later help came for me. This incident prompted me to think about portable power for my cell phone. I went through making a few prototypes and manufacturing and then .A few years later I came up with variations of portable power products.

Power tablet charger invention

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Terron: The “Power Tablet Charger” is designed not only to charge Tablets,also(Cell Phones,Bluetooth’s,GPS Systems,Digital Camera’s etc…) The “Power Tablet Charger can also charge multiple devices at the same time while still portable. You can charge your devices with the product two ways: Either Solar Power or USB Battery Power. The product comes with a unique patented USB Connector cord with (10) adapters connected to it.

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Terron: There were several steps I took after coming up with the idea:

  1. I researched on the internet,stores,USPTO Website etc… for any similar Patent products that’s similar to mine. Its very important to know about any similar products out there and to know your competition.
  2. I wrote out my invention details and functions in my Inventors Notebook and dated when I wrote this out. It’s a good idea to keep a notebook,journal or some type of dated writings on your idea inventions
  3. Next I had some sample drawings and product specifications done on my idea and worked with my manufacture engineers on the sample production.
  4. I contacted the United States Trademark and Patent Office(inventors hotline) www.uspto.com. I asked them various questions on Patents,Patent Forms,Patent Fees and general questions on invention ideas/process(Very Important Step).
  5. I filed a “Provisional Patent” or Patent Pending on my invention idea.

power tablet charger inventionTara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?


Terron: I did get some drawings/sketches done of the invention idea. I then proceeded to go to our manufacture with the drawings and idea and immediately started working on a prototype.

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?


Terron: Yes I took the first steps to the patent process which is a “Provisional Patent” or patent pending process. I contacted the United States Trademark and Patent Office(inventors hotline). They helped me tremendously with the questions I had and how to fill out the Patent forms. I would recommend an inventor to also consult an Patent Attorney also.

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?


Terron: At first I did not intend on manufacturing my invention. But after countless turn downs of licensing my Idea,I decided to go straight to the manufacture myself. This may have been my best move because I learned a lot about the manufacturing process as well as the prototyping process. This afforded me t eventually get more done at a faster pace and to my specifications.

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?


Terron:being in the military helped me find a manufacture. After traveling around the world I met numerous people,which in turn introduced me to the world of manufacturing. The rest is history!

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?


Tara: the best way I believe in promoting your invention is “WORD OF MOUTH”. Now with Social Media outlets it’s even easier to promote your invention. Another good way of promoting your invention is to enter Trade Shows,Invention Competitions,Interviews,Blogs & network with people in the same arena.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?


Terron: I believe the most difficult element of bring an invention to market is having the funding to bring a invention to market. I have learned to truly market a product especially on (T.V. & Radio) it can be very costly. This is one reason why many inventors seek licensing product deals

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?


Terron: it all depends on what the invention is and what avenues a person takes to get the invention out there. Getting a product to market time spans can vary. It has taken me about 2 years to get my initial idea retail & market ready.

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Terron: Yes I would have learned more about the inventing process and more about how to utilize the USPTO as an independent inventor. The USPTO is one of the best resources I discovered in this whole inventing process

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?


Terron: My advice to aspiring inventors would be:

  1. Do your Research on(Competition,Patents,Manufactures,Licensing)
  2. Contact the USPTO and ask questions about patents,Trademarks & copyrights
  3. Consult an (Certified) Patent Attorney
  4. Most importantly (NEVER EVER GIVE UP) KEEP INVENTING!!!

Tara: Where can people find out more about you &your invention?


Terron: The “Power Tablet Charger” can be found at www.powertabletcharger.com. To find out more about our company go to www.solarvillecommunications.com. Follow us on Twitter @powertabcharger


Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Interview with Kevin Marinan Inventor of PermaChase a Valve Box for Dialysis Machines

Kevin inventor permachase

In this inventor interview Kevin Marinan talks about his invention PermaChase

Tara: What is your name, invention name and website URL.

Kevin: Kevin Marinan. PermaChase. www.perma-chase.com.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, and your background experience on how you first started inventing?

Kevin: We are based out of Scottsdale, Arizona in the United States. PermaChase is my first invention. I have more than 20 years of experience as a general contractor, primarily building medical facilities that offer dialysis.

Tara: Could you please tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Kevin: PermaChase is a valve box that dialysis machines plug into. It’s also known as a water box. Medical personnel at the dialysis centers fill the valve boxes with the fluids needed for the dialysis procedure. We also developed the wall panels that go with the boxes that provide the space each patient needs during treatment.

The idea literally came to me in the night. I just realized, after working for so many years in the field, that things needed to be done differently. The valve boxes that are used now are difficult to access, can experience leaks, and are at times susceptible to mold. I’ve seen the disruption that machine failure or maintenance can mean for a patient who is in need of this life-sustaining treatment.

PermaChase eliminates those problems.

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having you idea?

Kevin: I first met with an architect friend of mine, Matt Lamont, who helped me sketch out this idea that was in my head. Then, I met with an engineer friend of mine, Jack Dillon, who helped bring the sketches to life. I’m fortunate to know quite a few people in the industry, given my line of work in constructing dialysis centers.

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention? How did you go about this?

Kevin: We made a prototype. We worked with Dillon, who runs Medical Solutions International. He helped us get our prototype together at a facility in Kansas. Dillon has connections with a molding company, and together we just worked through it based off of our drawings.

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Kevin: Yes. Our product is currently patent-pending. It didn’t seem that difficult of a process, but it is a long wait for the actual patent to come through. I spoke with another one of my friends who has had success bringing one of his inventions to market and he referred me to a patent attorney. The attorney did a search to see if there was anything like PermaChase out there, and we were thrilled to learn there was not.

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Kevin: We have always intended to manufacture the product ourselves. At this point, PermaChase manufactures the plastic for the valve box. Then, Medical Solutions International installs the actual valving in the box. Marathon Resources, Inc., my construction company, installs the equipment in the dialysis centers.

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self-fund this?

Kevin: Working with Dillon at Medical Solutions International seemed like a natural fit. Medical Solutions is the company that manufactured the valve boxes that are most commonly used now on the market.

We did use our own money to fund this project. We estimate that we’ve invested about $75,000 into this project so far.

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

Kevin: My connections formed over years of networking in the industry has helped quite a bit. But, we have also commissioned an advertising agency to help us with public relations, and it has really helped.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

Kevin: It takes time to change the way things have been done for a long time. In the dialysis industry, many processes have occurred the same way for years, and many products have been used for years. Our product brings a revolutionary idea to the market. Our biggest challenge is changing minds.

Also, dialysis equipment is pretty permanent. So, we are marketing to new clinics and to clinics that are being renovated. It’s really difficult to switch out wall boxes used in dialysis.

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Kevin: Since the night I decided to do something with my idea, until now, it’s been about 19 months. PermaChase is already in use at one local clinic and we are in talks with clinics on the East Coast of the U.S.

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Kevin: I wouldn’t say there is anything in particular that I learned through the process. It takes a natural trial-and-error effort. You tinker with things along the way to make them just right. And, that’s good. It only makes the product better. We feel strongly that PermaChase is a superior product and will only help the dialysis industry as a whole.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Kevin: My best advice is to seek protection.  Just make sure to protect your idea as soon as possible.  It’s such a valuable step.

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

Kevin: People can find out more about PermaChase at www.perma-chase.com or by calling 480-657-9808.

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Interview with Carla Leming Inventor of the Speed Bather for Dogs

In this inventor interview Carla Leming explains how she came up with the idea for her invention the Speed Bather

Carla Leming InventorTara: What is your name, invention name and website/invention website URL?

Carla: Name:  Carla Leming, Invention: The Speed Bather, Website URL:  www.PetEdge.com
Page on PetEdge website where the Speed Bather is for sale:  http://www.petedge.com/product/Master-Grooming-Tools-Speed-Bather-Bathing-Tools/58807.uts

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience and how you first started inventing?

Carla: I live in Mattoon, Illinois, a small town located in the central part of the state.  I’m presently a hairstylist, but I’ve also dabbled in other lines of work, such as singing in a band, being a dance instructor and working as a graphic artist at a printing company.  I seem to be drawn to jobs that give me a creative outlet.   I’ve always noticed improvements or changes I’d like to make to product designs, but never had an outlet until crowdsourcing websites began to spring up online.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Carla: The Speed Bather is a dual-purpose dog bathing tool with flexible silicone fingers on one side for working shampoo deep into the fur when lathering.  The opposite side of the tool has silicone “fins” to squeegee excess water down the drain before towel-drying.  The idea for this dog bathing tool came to me when using multiple towels to dry off my long-aired dog after her bath.  I knew there had to be a way to flush a good deal of this water down the drain, before I began toweling her off.  A slick squeegee with a scalloped edge came to mind, and the Speed Bather was born – and much thanks be given to Genius Crowds for refining my original vision into a sleek quality product.

Tara: Did you create a roughy prototype or drawings to test out and present your ideas?

Carla: I didn’t make a prototype, but I did use my drawing program to make illustrations for the “Dog Squeegee”, as it was originally titled.  When I began refining my idea, I added the silicone shampooing “fingers” to make the tool dual-purpose.

Tara: You submitted your idea to Genius Crowds and it won, please can you tell me a bit about it works?

Carla: At Genius Crowds, the panel of judges are constantly looking over new and old submissions for ideas that catch their interest.  My dog bathing tool wasn’t selected for a contract until many months after it had been submitted to a Pets call-out round.  All ideas are free to submit at GC, and the generous community members offer input and suggestions to help ideas along.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PRN19wkMDmE

speed bather invention

Tara: You submit a lot of ideas, have you got any tips for coming up with original ideas, what is your process?

Carla: I wish I could say I have a definitive creative process when it comes to product ideas, but I don’t.  Mostly, my ideas are inspired by a problem I’d like to solve that I’ve recently been reminded of during my daily life.  Sometimes my ideas are completely unique and others are just improvements on existing gadgets and devices used every day.

Tara: After your idea was chosen as as a winner, what was the process from this point, did you get involved with further design input?

Carla: After receiving email notification that Genius Crowds has selected your idea as a prototype contender, you will be emailed a copy of their contract to sign and return.  I have two other contracts with Genius Crowds, and during the months after being selected, I’ve been kept in the loop on their progress, when there was news to be shared.  With all three of my selected ideas, I’ve been asked to send new drawings or been contacted for more input on each of those chosen ideas.

Tara: What are the pros and cons of submitting ideas to sites like Genius Crowds rather than developing it or licensing it yourself.

Carla: For me, invention websites are ideal, because I am not much of a gambler.  I would be extremely reluctant to financially back one of my ideas that could end up costing our life’s savings.  I’m still amazed at the number of ideas I think are sure-fire winners, that have been passed over time and again.  Obviously, the professionals on the judging panels know a lot more about the marketplace than I do.

Tara: What happens now, will you have a share of royalties in the product sales?

Carla: I will get a 25% share of the royalties paid to Genius Crowds.  I’m looking forward to receiving my first check in the mail – no matter what the amount.  It will be a thrill to know that my two years of submitting ideas will give me a return on my time invested.

Tara: What are your future invention plans and dreams?

Carla: My future plans are to take the time to learn at least one of the many 3D drawing programs I’ve bought or downloaded.  I’ve been using a very old version of Microsoft Publisher for my illustrations, and I’d like to be able to submit more professional presentations of my ideas.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Carla: Don’t become married to an idea that doesn’t seem to get the attention you think it deserves.  Use that creative energy to move onto other problems that need to be solved.  One day, you’ll hit upon a solution that will resonate with the buying public!

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

Carla: The Speed Bather can be found here on the PetEdge website:  https://www.petedge.com/product/Master-Grooming-Tools-Speed-Bather-Bathing-Tools/58807.uts

PetEdge is a wholesale company that sells to professional pet groomers and to independent pet supply stores all over the world.

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Interview with Sally Guyer Creator of Cambridge RainCoats – Fashion Rainwear for Bicycles

In this inventor interview Sally Guyer talks about creating her product Cambridge Raincoats, because when she wanted a stylish yet functional raincoat she could wear cycling and couldn’t find one.

Tara: Please could you tell me your name, product name and website URL?

Sally: Sally Guyer, The Cambridge Raincoat Company; Cambridge Raincoats – fashion rainwear for upright bicycles; www.cambridgeraincoats.co.uk

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Saly: I live 5 miles south of Cambridge, the UK’s number 1st city of cycling.  My life is bike-based and that is how I prefer to get around. My daily commute is 5 miles each way, cycling into central Cambridge in all weathers all year round. I’m not interested in cycling as a sport and I don’t like sports clothes.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your product, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Sally: As a busy woman, I wanted a fully functional coat that I could wear without embarrassment or needing to change on arrival at my destination.  I couldn’t find it so decided to create it myself. Cambridge Raincoats are the first coats to combine Savile Row styling with high performance fabric in bright colours. This means it’s unnecessary to wear hi-vis and that the coats are lightweight, highly water-resistant, windproof, breathable and washable.  Nevertheless, they look like groovy ‘normal’ coats anyone might like to wear.

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Sally: I’ve never worked in the clothing industry so didn’t know where to start. Before the Internet got going, I tried going to the library and asking around but it was the Internet which really allowed me to drive the idea forward. Having access to so much information was life-changing.

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

Sally: I can’t draw so I asked around to find a pattern cutter. I then explained my idea to her and she drew what I described before producing the prototype.

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Sally: I tried to copywrite my idea but found I can’t copywrite the concept; I can protect individual garment design, the company name, colours, brand image etc but not the concept.

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Sally: I always intended to manufacture (via outsourcing) but am also currently investigating licensing the idea too.

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

Sally: It was like kissing a lot of toads before finding your prince! It was thanks to a mentor I acquired via a Linked In group that I met my manufacturer, the one I use now.

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

Sally: Social media has been a godsend but having the support of local businesses and winning a business competition have also been instrumental. In the beginning, I used social media to connect with all the relevant bike groups I could find in the world. Being a Spanish speaker helped a lot.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

Sally: Funding.

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Sally: I had to sit on the idea for over 5 years before finding a way to bring it to market.

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Sally: No. Mistakes made are valuable and an opportunity to learn something new.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Sally: Don’t give up. Don’t seek other people’s approval, take yourself seriously.

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your product?

Sally: On our website, www.cambridgeraincoats.co.uk

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com