An Interview with David Sykes about his Invention the Multitask Joist Hanger

David Sykes inventor of the Multitask Joist HangerIn this inventor interview David Sykes talks about his invention the Multitask Joist Hanger

Tara: What is your name, invention name and website URL?

David: David Sykes – Multitask Joist Hanger – www.new-inventions.co.uk

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

David: I am based in Aylesbury – Buckinghamshire – England

Today I am a retired ‘OAP’ who requires funding for the Invention and create a ‘BRAND NAME’ for the product

Life began as a bonded apprentice to the motor trade as a Coach Builder & more, when I completed my apprenticeship I changed careers for one of Public Service and was very much focused on problem solving on every aspect life could bring with it in the Human sense. This provided an opportunity as the years rolled by to use my skills and experiences in focusing and challenging my knowledge into Disruptive technology – Doing things differently and to improve on the present at the time – Never to accept it cannot be done that way or this, push the boundaries to its limit for change and never take no for an answer. Be a free thinker without handicaps or devils advocates tripping you up as to what your passions and dreams are made of and to find that extra mile to bring too fruition and the reality of seeing your achievements come to life for the benefits of others.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-XAR2svRDU

David: The multitask Joist Hanger was designed to incorporate those who lack the skills and knowledge of Construction, whether it be for DIY use in building Sheds, Bases, Workshops & Decking. The building industry clearly does not like change and very much sits on protectionism and cartels as by rule of thumb.

The lay person, the public in general would not normally consider using single joist hangers as such products are confined to the building industry. Therefore, my product opens up a greater market where those who are able and capable of using a lightweight product that once used forms a very solid construction, where timber joists are supported and cradled and not just timber to timber fixing. In today’s markets the public have greater use of garden sheds and workshops for business and pleasure. Of course floors and roofs require strengthened support and to be easily constructed without specialist skills my product achieves that for the lay person. Furthermore, unlike single hangers, my product can be recycled many times over to be cost effective for the user.

To provide a quality product that caters more for the user in being lightweight and an adaptable product in building a quality product of their own albeit, a shed or workshop etc that affords their own dreams in shape, design and use.

joist hanger invention

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

David: Two o/clock one morning (7 yrs ago) the hanger concept along with three other ideas plagued my sleep until I decided to use the Computer and start off loading my thoughts and ideas and this I did, So hours later I had knocked into shape 4 new inventions. The hanger project came first and is and always been my main choice to continually pursue until fruition (meaning that I was able to obtain a British Patent)I had many comments about it could not be done, how can you etc, well the proof of the pudding is in the eating – I own today the Patent on the invention.

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

David: I approached a professional in mechanical engineering who was able to draw up a series of not to scale drawings, this allowed me to adapt further a number of ideas and then onto the first of the prototypes, the final moment came when I was able to use for the very first time the product. Once satisfied I had more manufactured for home use and to create decking walkways around my garden and office as seen in the pictures shown on the website.

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

David: From start to finish (Grant of Patent) has took seven years (7 yrs) of my life, I suppose it’s about living the dream against adversity and those who tried to disrupt or slow me down. Although, none of this would have been possible without finding and engaging with a Patent Attorney who had the same beliefs and energy to make it all happen for me. Working as a team effort to consider every possible eventuality as to the workings of the Hanger and includes a Patent application that remains very comprehensive and includes other inventions within the Patent.

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

David: I am by circumstance a serial inventor who specialises in disruptive technologies. How my thinking works and where the ideas come from I have decided not to challenge or analysis my thoughts. Others have tried, so the bigger challenge is with so many ideas and projects do I want to manage and market one Invention or do I consider alternatives by Partner Investing, Joint Ventures, and Collaboration or to license on the Invention for royalty payments. To this end I am still very open-minded as to what best suits my situation and to consider any commercial interests in sharing equity and this remains THE CASE TODAY – I AM OPEN TO OFFERS.

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

David: I spent 5 years researching and browsing the internet for a British Company able to produce my Prototypes. The task was very frustrating as clearly this would not have been a problem in my younger years as Britain had the skills and opportunities to produce anything one required. I had been quoted a price of £16.000 to £30.000 for tooling requirements in order to produce my product. I knew this was not the case that somewhere I would find a company and indeed a company virtually on my own doorstep and able to manufacture and produce volume at an affordable price to trade on for profit and allows for big margins across the board.

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

David: At the moment ‘NONE’ although, the shopping channels would be idea and would keep advertising to a very minimal cost overall as television exposure would provide a greater market than using numerous sources and obviously the financial implications would be far greater than I would want at this stage of the product. Again I have found a greater interest through word and mouth as peoples common sense values are soon realised as the product is very visual and unlike the single hanger products. One pair of my products provides an Instant, Fast fixing solution in minutes, this could be a shed base 10 ft X 10 ft, where as the single hanger requires much more time in fixing, spacing out and leveling off.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

David: Funding today is my greatest challenge in knowing how this product would change people’s lives. The Building Hanger for new build dwellings (requires certification) would take more than a week off the build in time and labour. What I have achieved overall has been self funded by myself and as an ‘OAP’ much of what I have available has gone towards the Invention and protecting my Patents as I have Patent Protection in Europe, Canada and USA and of course this is a very expensive exercise but is vital and essential in order to succeed.

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

David: 7 years, although, once again Funding is the most difficult as any lone and independent Inventor in Britain will tell you that the Business, Innovation & Skills Department (British Government) very much ignores the difficulties that we as individuals experience as we have no backup services like Corporations and Universities our lives are very much governed by those closest to us or we go with cap in hand and just hope that we will be recognised. The lone Inventor does not have a national body to represent them, so being very much a one man or women band is and will always be time consuming in search of being accepted and where this will bring the funding opportunities one hopes for to bring the Invention to market

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

David: Consultants, the market is littered with consultants and all sing from the same song sheet. They all appear to have the answers as to how you should be approaching the markets and how you should be running your business. But then I prefer Action to words, so be careful and not put your hand in your pocket and throw good money after bad. At times I have wondered as to how many have swallowed and digested the same dictionary, very flowering statements by most but little mention of your product(s) The paranoia that surrounds business plans is so comical and at times very scientific (if you let them) mind boggling performances and should be awarded Oscars for their efforts. There are very good people out there but you need to research before committing one’s self, services are free, but be wise in your choice. My main argument is simple if such people were that wise with business, then surely they ought to be multi-millionaires enjoying retirement, but my experience overall is the laziness of the individual, had a big lunch, eyes fluttering and you are talking to a person in a suit, why should they get their hands dirty when they have you hook line and sinker.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

David: Do as much prior research as one can possibly do – Does your Invention solve a problem – Is it better than what is sold on the market or is your idea the first of a new generation of undiscovered products. Use the Patent Office and British Library for free advice and research. Keep a tight rein on your confidentiality and to engage ones thinking to establish ‘Proof of Concept’. When satisfied source out a reputable Patent Attorney who shows a true interest rather than just another customer coming through the door, you need a friend and confidante one who you can relate too as a working team and consider the overall costs involved and how you can cover such immediate costs before you apply for a Patent Application – Never be rushed, be patient and be confident with your endeavours overall.

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

David: I have two links on the Internet, both provide and show how the product works www.new-inventions.co.uk and the video is on Youtube

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please see this post for more information

Interview with Inventor Shawn Moye about the Electronic Basketball Shooting Coach

In this inventor interview Shawn Moye who invented a product to help people learn how to shoot a basketball.

Shawn Moye inventorTara: What is your name, invention name and website URL?

Shawn: Shawn Moye, electronic basketball shooting coach, http://www.electronicshootingcoach.com

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Shawn: I am located in Phoenix Arizona. When I first started, I did not know where to turn. I was only 16, living in Ohio, had no money, and no one around me with patent experience so I thought I was stuck. However, what I did know was that it’s important to protect your idea because what may be a dream to you may be a nightmare to someone else. So I eventually turned to turn to an invention submission company for protection. They were eager to help me following an $11,000 upfront fee. After doing an assignment an investor gave me I found out through the Better Business Bureau that the invention submission company had numerous lawsuits pending against it. I now have my Master’s in Business Management with an minor in Entrepreneurship and have been inventing for over 20 years.

basket ball coaching gadget

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Shawn: We are the creators of The Electronic Basketball Shooting Coach (EBSC), which is endorsed by college and AAU coaches and is ergonomically design to help kids develop the muscle memory needed to maintain proper form when shooting a basketball. I came up with this product while I was trying to teach my son the proper way to shoot a basketball. As I looked around the park I saw that a lot of kids were trying to learn the same thing but didn’t have anyone there to teach them properly. The adults that were with the kids didn’t have the knowledge to teach them properly either. That is when I first came up with the idea. What sets this product apart is the Chip On Board technology that allows this product to talk to you. Yes, it talks! It’s like having a coach on your arm! (Good for people of all ages). Our recently patented product is the answer to the youth’s dilemma when learning how to shoot a basketball correctly. Our product, the Electronic Basketball Shooting Coach, helps create the muscle memory need to maintain proper form when shooting a basketball. The E.B.S.C is lightweight weighing only 70 grams, self contained, and easy to use. It will make learning how to properly shoot a basketball more exciting, especially for the millions of youth basketball players who are fast becoming students of the game and not just players of the game. Up until now, a novice basketball player had no accurate method to identify if they were shooting a basketball properly. When you shoot the basketball with the elbow tucked in the product will not sound but if your elbow is out when you shoot the basketball then an alarm will talk and tell you to “keep your elbow tucked in”. Speaking four different phrases when you wear this product it’s like having a real coach on your arm! We have revolutionized the way youth are taught how to shoot a basketball and have raised the bar for the industry by supplying a higher performing product, which ensures a higher performance for the consumer. Golf is next!

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tm_Om4yh1qU

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

 

Shawn: I did not know it at the time but the library is where the first step of my thousand-mile journey began. I decided to check out a book on patents. I know its considered taboo to attempt to learn about patents but my inquiring mind wanted to know what was so terrifying. I had to find out why patent attorney’s or invention submission companies are the only entities entitled to learn about the patent process. That day changed my life forever.

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

Shawn: I found a toy designer online to build my prototype for me. Now, I am not an attorney but I would be remiss if I didn’t mention to clearly state everything you want them to do for you in writing in a signed contract. I bring it up because somewhere along the process the toy designer began to love my idea so much that he asked if I wanted to renegotiate the contract we had. After I declined, he said “I wish I had asked for more in the beginning”. I did have a company make some drawings for me which helped when I began to patent my product.

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Shawn: After learning about different patents, I decided to save time and money by preparing a provisional patent on my own before developing a utility patent. The provisional patent gave me a year to conduct focus groups to find out if my product was functional before I spent thousands on a utility patent. I filed for an utility patent own my own and have just been approved for my utility patent on 6/18/2013. People said I needed a patent attorney but I didn’t. We can do anything we put our minds too.

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Shawn: I have always intended to manufacture my product. It has been difficult but it has been fun. I got online and found companies that could manufacture my product. I am now working with off shore companies but it can be hard because when a change needs to be made it takes a longer time to have the changes made. Recently I have begun looking for licensing deals.

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

Shawn: I contacted offshore agents who offered to find companies but because of my limited capital I decided to find some companies I have been blessed enough to have find two offshore companies to make my product.

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

Shawn: The best ways I have found to promote my invention is through social media sites and through my website. I have found a marketing company that has helped me get my product in desired events.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

Shawn: It is hard trying to get in front of buyers for companies and raising the funding to build inventory. Most times major companies want you to have the clients and orders before contacting them but its hard if you don’t have the money to do so.

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Shawn: It has taken about 3 years because I wanted to make sure I had all of my I’s dotted and T’s crossed before I tried to contact any companies. I have heard of people having their ideas stolen because they were not properly protected.

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Shawn: I wouldn’t do anything differently!

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Shawn: I would tell them to never give up on their dreams! Its going to be hard, people are going to tell you it wont work, people are going to envious, but don’t let it stop you. Take one-step at a time, put yourself around positive people, talk to people that are at the level you are trying to get too, and just do it!

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

Shawn: People can find out more about my invention at

For more information please contact Shawn Moye at shawnmoye@themoyegroup.com 480-363-5736

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Interview with Adrian Hayward Inventor of Pick Tack for Guitar Players

An inventor interview with Adrian Hayward, who invented the Pick Tack – a guitarist pick holder with a twist. Make sure you check out his Kickstarter Campaign

Pick Tack Inventor

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Adrian: I am currently living in Minehead, Somerset UK and I conceived my first invention at 12 years old. I sought advice from a few people and even went to a business advisor a while later, but didn’t have the tools to proceed. A few years later I saw that my idea was on the market but someone else had got there first! I was gutted that I hadn’t been able to do anything with it but it gave me confidence that my idea had been a winner.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

pick tack diagramAdrian: Pick Tack is a simple pick holder with a twist. As well as storing 3 picks, like many conventional holders, it has a putty pad that enables you to stick and retrieve your plectrum quickly and easily when you’re playing. Many people seem to invent by problem-solving. I have always found the ideas come to me without any obvious thought process, effort or build up. That may not seem like helpful information but I have found that my best ideas come when I get out of the way of them and allow them to surface.

The idea of Pick Tack came in the way I’ve just described: I have been playing guitar for over 25 years. My unique playing style requires that I constantly change between pick and finger methods.

When I invented Pick Tack, I was performing professionally around my area of the South West and I found that I was always mislaying my pick between songs or sets. I would balance it on the music stand, balance it on the guitar or even hold it between my teeth. The last option, although more effective than the other two, only worked if I wasn’t singing. I’ve seen many guitarists struggle with this same issue.

After looking at the problems and solutions from many different angles, I came up with a solution that solved all of my requirements and Pick Tack was born, or at least I had found a substance that solved the problem. It would be a while before it became Pick Tack as it is today.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTA1VZvW_8M

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Adrian: From the age of about 14 until late 2012 (22 years later), I had all but forgotten about inventing. Initially, the idea was purely a personal solution and it didn’t dawn on me that it was a marketable idea.

At that point I had been trying various kinds of self-employed work because I knew I didn’t want a regular job. I had very little work coming in and wasn’t satisfied with any that I did have. I was spending every day on the internet looking for jobs and work-at-home opportunities. An idea came to me to look up courses on inventing and I came across InventRight and looked into what they had to offer. It only took me a few hours to realise that their course was exactly what I needed so I scraped the money together for the first instalment and signed up.

With the InventRight course you get personal mentoring from one of the two co-founders and I soon had my first Skype call with my mentor. I discussed some of the ideas that I had and he advised that I go for something simple to start off with. I chose what would later become known as Pick Tack and began to work through the 10 steps laid out in the course.

pick tack invention for guitars

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

Adrian: I was invited to a wedding and on the way up, my friend asked me what I’d been up to. I told them about the course and shared a couple of my ideas with them. They informed me that I would be sharing a room where we were staying with a guy who was a 3D designer. That night, we stayed up for hours discussing my ideas and he said he’d be up for helping to design what was still just a concept in my mind. After a few weeks we had 3 designs and I had picked one to use as the centrepiece for a sell sheet to give to companies to promote my idea. Using the CAD file, the designer was able to create a rough prototype so we could shoot a video for promotion.

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Adrian: My mentor advised me to patent the idea just before approaching companies. I had decided I would go for the US market, partly because InventRight is based there and so I thought I’d take advantage of the expertise and having an avenue in. This meant I was able to utilise their provisional patent option, which allows you to file a claim in plain English rather than legal speak. I used a book called Patent Pending in 24 hours by Richard Stim, Attorney. It gave me all the info I needed to put together a document that I was confident had covered all the necessary information and requirements.

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Adrian: InventRight is setup to help people take their idea to market through licensing to companies, so that was always my intention. I was looking for a way to free me up to concentrate on my music career without the music bearing all the pressure of providing my entire income. I had been approaching manufacturers for a few months in the music industry and had been finding it hard to even get to the right people. I had some encouraging responses from some very reputable companies, but none that wanted to include Pick Tack in their retail line.

I came to a point where I felt that I needed to consider other ways of taking Pick Tack to market. I got in touch with an old contact who has been a successful entrepreneur for many years. He got back to me within a few hours and we talked things through, and as a result I decided to venture Pick Tack as a business. From then on, the whole dynamic changed for the better.

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

Adrian: My friend, who I just referred to, is already connected with a manufacturer that he has used for a while so I was able to make use of an already existing arrangement. We decided it would be a great idea to launch the project on Kickstarter and it has just gone live today at the time of writing. Kickstarter is an amazing platform for raising the initial capital needed to get things off the ground. It also proves that there is a market for whatever you’re funding and helps to create a fan base. I have put some of my own money in as well but have tried to keep that to a minimum, as nothing is guaranteed when it comes to business. It is possible to keep running costs very low if you are resourceful and it doesn’t mean you have to compromise on quality.

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

Adrian: As I’ve just mentioned, Kickstarter is an amazing place to host your product and has a great following, but this on its own is not enough. You need to find a way to get people to the site to look at it. The number one way I have chosen to promote is through social media, especially Facebook. I made a list of relevant people that I thought would be interested in Pick Tack or willing to help spread the word. I then contacted them all one by one to tell them about the launch. This way I hoped it would have a personal feel, rather than just me spamming them to get likes or money.

I will be contacting bloggers and music publications as well, to try and widen my reach but these are secondary methods.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

Adrian: Although Pick Tack has not made it to market yet, there have been some difficult obstacles to overcome so far. When you work with others, you are often restricted to their timetables and ways of doing things. I am referring to the big companies that I approached over the last few months. They take their time about everything and they have their way of doing things. This can be very frustrating when you want to move things along.

I have struggled a great deal with maintaining belief and enthusiasm in what I’m doing during the long period of waiting for ‘a break’. I think time can be one of the biggest killers of dreams!

The most difficult obstacle for me to overcome was one that I believe nearly everybody faces who has not been taught the best ways to take something from concept to market. It is not a science but a learning experience and I cannot imagine that I would be where I am without input from people who have already been down the kind of paths I’m now taking. The biggest help for me along the way has been a course that guides you through proven steps to take and a mentor who has the experience to navigate through the twists and turns that are brand new to me but that he’s seen many times before. I can’t recommend enough finding someone who can help in this way!

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Adrian: From the point of conception until now and reaching Kickstarter, it has been about 10 months and providing the Kickstarter project is successful, it should only be about 2 or 3 more to market. I have loved nearly every minute of it and don’t really view it as ‘work’, although I have worked incredibly hard throughout this time on this and other projects, some days working as much as 18 hours. I mention this because I always believed that business ventures were the easy way out and I never believed the veterans when they said how hard it can be. I genuinely thought that my journey would be different but it has been long and hard (as well as incredibly enjoyable).

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Adrian: As I have said, I had a proven method to follow so that eliminated a lot of the mistakes I would have otherwise encountered. The only thing that I would probably do differently is to spend less time trying to perfect everything. It’s in my nature to do so, as with a lot of inventors, but it doesn’t make enough of a difference to warrant the time it takes.
I have ended up venturing the idea, so have been able to retain a lot of the ideas I came up with. If I had ended up licensing, it it’s possible that the manufacturer would have changed a great deal of stuff I’d agonised over. Not only would this have wasted some precious time but it would have been harder in the long run to let go of control when it came to a licensing deal.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Adrian: Don’t give up. You never know when a breakthrough’s going to come. Actually, it often seems to come just after you had the chance to give up but didn’t take it. Find a mentor or anyone wiser who is further along the journey than yourself. Learn how to learn. The internet is full of amazing advice but there’s so much of it and at first you have no way of measuring its accuracy or validity. The more you learn, the more efficient you become and the faster you can find out what you need to know. Create space to be creative and learn to feed yourself with the best ideas and information for you, so that inventing is just a natural by-product.

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

The best place at the moment is the Kickstarter site. It has everything anyone could want to know about the story behind the idea, the benefits it brings and the way to get one if you want one.

Facebook Page – https://www.facebook.com/PickTackClassic, Twitter – https://twitter.com/PickTack

 

 

 

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Interview with George Wood the Inventor of FREEZE N GO

George Inventor Freeze N GoIn this inventor interview George Wood explains how he took a problem that was bothering him, (not being able to keep a drink cool at night) and created his FREEZE N GO invention to solve it.

Tara: What is your name, invention name and website URL?

George: George Wood, FREEZE N GO freezengo.com

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

George: I’m located in Jensen Beach, Florida. My background is in sales, 25 years in the hardware industry and 10 in ceramic/porcelain flooring distribution.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

George: It is a personal beverage cooler that when frozen, will keep your beverage cold for over 12 hours indoors. For over 40 years I have gone to bed with a cold drink only to wake up in the middle of the night and it was warm, no way to keep it cold. When I was cleaning out the freezer one day, I accidently left a freeze gel pack on the counter overnight. When I went to move it the next day, it was still cold. I went to Walmarts and purchased four additional but smaller freeze gel packs. I then went home and duct taped them together around a bottle of water. I then put the duct taped freeze gel packs in the freezer overnight. The next day, I removed the unit and put a bottle of water in it and a thermometer in the bottle of water, it stayed at 38 degrees all day long, thus the FREEZE N GO was born. I used it for a week next to my bed, it worked great but needed something to insulate and reduce the condensation. I ended up making a 5mm neoprene sleeve to wrap around the FREEZE N GO to insulate and reduce condensation. The insulation sleeve also makes a great “billboard” to advertise on.

Invention prototype

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

George: After using the duct taped unit for a week and liking it so well, I proceeded in making a smaller unit out of cardboard to see what it would look like. I then researched it on the Internet to see if there was anything like it on the market. Not finding anything, a patent attorney was hired to do a patent search. The search came back clear in about six weeks, I then applied for a utility patent which was granted in less than 120 days.

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of your invention, how did you go about this?

George: After receiving the patent, I contacted a plastic injection manufacturer with my cardboard prototype to design it in detail on their 3-d cad computer. After being satisfied with the final design, a plastic injection mold was made to produce the FREEZE N GO.

Keep drinks cold invention

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

George: As stated, the FREEZE N GO is patented and trademarked.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5orQhPqobyE

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

George: Didn’t really want to get involved with the manufacturing of it but had to see if it actually worked as intended. Now that we know that it works, would love an opportunity to license it to an existing manufacturer that can market it throughout the world. Because of the “Mass Appeal” the FREEZE N GO has, I have had request for distribution from France, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Belgium, Brazil, Turkey, Mexico and Russia. In fact, Russia did a story on the FREEZE N GO in their publication titled “Top 1000 Marketing Ideas of the World”.

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

George: I knew that there would be a number of issues to be resolved during the manufacturing process. If it was made in China, I would not have been able to be involved in correcting the issues we were presented with. I wanted a manufacturer that was located close to resolve issues as they came up. I probably took over thirty trips (twenty miles away) to my selected manufacturer to resolve various issues. A majority of the funding came from a personal friend and former employer.

NOTE: For years we have gone to Las Vegas yearly to have a good time. I always complained while in the hotel room that I could not keep my drink cold all night. I told him if I could ever invent something that could, I’d be rich. Well I invented it, but sure haven’t gotten rich yet!!!!

Freeze N Go Invention advert

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

George: The best way would be television and the most expensive. Social media including Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter and YouTube would be good if I would learn more about it. I’m currently selling the FREEZE N GO’s on my web site at www.freezengo.com, Jamin’ Jensen, a street type table top shin dig in my home town of Jensen Beach on Thursday nights, a couple local golf courses, local Ace Hardware Stores and word of mouth. Approximately 2,000 have been sold since production.

Probably the best way to promote and market the FREEZE N GO is with the insulation sleeve that comes with it. The sleeve makes an excellent four sided “Billboard” to promote or license a wide range of businesses, schools. Hotels, restaurants, fund raisers and casinos to name a few. In fact, we have a pending order for 1800 units from a casino located in Washington State and a watch maker located in Miami for a promotion this summer.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

George: I would have to say the issues we have had with the plastic cracking after multiple freeze thaw cycles. We ended up using a resin instead of a plastic, a more expensive product.

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

George: It took a little over two years, nearly eight months to get the mold made and delivered.

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

George: Several things, would design a multiple mold to produce two or four units at a time and automate filling and sealing via sonic weld.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

George: Don’t give up and make sure that you have the financial resources to reach your goal.

 Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

George:  www.freezengo.com, FREEZENGO Facebook and a number of articles on the Internet.

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com

Inventor Lucy Mitchell talks about her Invention the MagneClip®

Lucy A Mitchell Inventor of MagneClip Dog Leash ClipIn this inventor interview Lucy A Mitchell shares her story of bringing her invention MagneClip® to market. MagneClip® is a new snap hook (used on things like dog leashes) which use a magnet rather than a conventional spring. Lucy currently has a crowdfunding campaign to help raise money for her product at http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/magneclip-magnetic-snaphook/x/1704284

Tara: What is your name, invention name and website URL?

Lucy: Lucy A Mitchell, my invention the MagneClip® www.magneclip.com

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Lucy: I live in Wiltshire UK. I moved back to the UK after living in Florida USA for 20 years. I originally went to Florida to do some flight training and to become a pilot. I ended up staying after teaching others to fly to build up my flight experience.

I think I have always like to design different things. I remember as a child being annoyed at things that didn’t work properly, or being unable to find good information.

I don’t have an engineering degree, but certainly having a good understanding of how and why things work is a blessing. I’m certainly glad I insisted in studying engineering drawing at school even though girls weren’t allowed to take the subject and were supposed to do typing. That would have been useful too. But those were the days before everyone had computers and I had never typed anything in my life.

I studied various practical subjects when I was training to become a pilot and physics, chemistry and mathematics at school were so important. I also used to help fix engines and motorbikes and cars as a teenager.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about your invention, what it is, and how you came up with the idea?

Lucy: The MagneClip® Ease is a snap hook. Just like the ones used on dog leashes and backpacks. But instead of using a spring like every other snap hook I used a magnet instead.

I came up with the idea after I was at a pet tradeshow in 2010 in Germany. I was talking to a vendor and playing with one of his leashes. It slide bolt snapped back and the button flipped my thumbnail off the nail bed and tore my nail. Painful and I needed to go and get it repaired.

The big difference with springs and magnets are their force and how that force is applied. If you look at my video of the bow and arrow you can see how a spring works. It has little or no force when it is at rest. Just like a spring snap hook. This means the slide bolt can start to rattle when it gets old. It is also very easy to open very slightly. But as you try to open it further it becomes progressively harder. When the slide bolt is fully open it is like the bow and arrow. Ready to shoot if your thumb slips. The small knob on the slide bolt is what hurts. It catches your nail, knuckle or even your dog and hits it full force.

A magnet works the opposite. It has full force when it is closed. So it wants to stay closed. But as you open it magnets quickly lose most of their attraction when they are only a millimeter or two apart. That means when it is fully open you don’t have to struggle keeping it open and if you let go by accident it cannot build up any momentum so it closes gently. You just get a click over the last millimeter and that is too small to injure any part of your body.

As the MagneClip® Ease opens inwards it means you don’t have to bend your thumb at the joints. That is very good for anyone with arthritis, or women that just have smaller less powerful hands than men do. You simply apply pressure at the opening and it clicks on.

I could bore everyone for an hour explaining exactly how and why it works. But when you use it you can instantly tell the difference. It may look almost the same but until you get it in your hands you won’t really get it.

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Lucy: After I came up with the idea, I first did some rough drawings. Very rough. When I look at them now I smile as they are pretty ragged. I sent them to an engineering design company I had worked with in the past for their input. They responded with a yes it will work and what an interesting idea. They made up a prototype on a 3D printer and sent me the sample and drawings. I sent them to my attorney to do a patent search.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MKTr7yF_pYs

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Lucy: To my amazement there was nothing similar. So I filed a utility patent. Then came the hard part, trying to find a manufacturer.

Magneclip dog leash collar connector

Tara: Did you always intend manufacturing your invention yourself or did you look into licensing the idea?

Lucy: I attended another trade show and spoke quietly to several companies. They had all said that the snap hooks were a problem. I had them sign a NDA (non disclosure agreement) and then showed them my new still unnamed snap hook. Most of the vendors liked it. The market is targeted towards women as about 80% of buyers are female. So most vendors ‘got it’ .The only one that didn’t was a company specializing in large leashes for very large dogs. Their clients were almost 100% male under the age of 45, so not many of them would have thumb issues.

I did think about licensing, but I couldn’t find a company that was interested. Most of the manufacturers of hardware for pet products are in Asia. US manufacturers buy from them. As the snap hook is just a part they just wanted to buy from me or from the factory.

Tara: How did you go about finding a suitable manufacturer for your invention and did you self fund this?

Lucy: I ended up finding a manufacturer from the tradeshow. Another vendor told me he could help and put me in touch with his factory. Most companies guard their suppliers names incase you try to go around them. The company was in Taiwan and he comes with me when I visit and translates for me.

So far I have funded everything my self. It has been hard working full time and doing everything by my self. Money is always tight and it has been a steep learning curve.

I have just started a crowdfunding campaign on indiegoggo.com, here’s the link.

http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/magneclip-magnetic-snaphook/x/1704284

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sPZsFTVd_jw

Tara: What have you found are the best ways of promoting your invention?

Lucy: Going to tradeshows has been a great way of getting out there. I had my first booth last October and I had one person helping me out. She has past sales experience. She went to all the other pet leash manufactures at the show with a leaflet with our booth location and information. She took a leash with her and invited them to come and visit. They did.

Vendors get upset if you try to sell them something at the show. They paid for a booth to sell you something. But by inviting them to our booth when they had some down time worked very well. Everyone at the show knew who we were.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing your invention to market?

Lucy: One of the most difficult things I found and I’m still finding is dealing with men and their attitude towards me. Manufacturers are still mainly men and they have an opinion that women must be dumb and don’t know what they are talking about. This has cost me a lot of time and money.

An example is every manufacturer has presumed they knew best as they already make snap hooks. True but none of them know anything about magnets. They insisted they do it there way and wanted to cut me out of all the designs. Well after they couldn’t get anything to work they came back to me and I had to fix all their mistakes. I had to give them some very basic physics lessons. This may also be part Asian culture that they can’t admit failure. I’m not entirely sure but it has been an obstacle.

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing your invention that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Lucy: I’m not sure what I would do differently. A good mentor would have been a plus. I’m still looking for one. If you know of any send them my way.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Lucy: My advice to anyone wanting to be an inventor is, get a good education. Far too often girls skip science subjects at school. Having a good fundamental idea of how things work and some practical experience is invaluable.

Do some business studies and learn something about patents and how they work. Read some good business books. If you look for a business partner, look for the opposite to yourself. No point in you both having the same skills. If one of you is good at marketing and accounting then the other needs to be creative. At least one of you needs good people skills.

I outsource everything I’m not good at. 99Designs.com has been great for logo, brochure designs as well as product labels. I also hire from Elance.com I have my CGI drawings done from contractors I found there. I also found a CAD engineer there too.

I have also found so much help from Twitter. There are all kinds of interesting people there. The Shark Tank and Dragons Den has been useful If you can’t get one of the investors to listen to you try the people who were on the show looking for an investment. They will usually respond and help you out with information.

Tara: So what’s next?

Lucy: Well I’m working on the new MagneClip® Secure a locking version of the first MagneClip®. The prototype will be done in a few days. I already have people waiting to see it.

After that it will be those horrible buckles used on dog collars and luggage bags. I received so many complaints about them people have begged me to design a new one.

Tara: Where can people find out more about you your invention?

Here are some of my links. If you have any helpful advice please feel free to contact me.

http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/magneclip-magnetic-snaphook/x/1704284

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Fido-Fashion/154720697877517

www.magneclip.com

l.mitchell@magneclip.com

 

 

 

Interview with Matt Butler about his Invention a Game Called Rollors

Matt Butler Rollors InventorIn this inventor interview Matt Butler talks through his story of creating the game Rollors, which combines Bocce Ball, Horseshoes, and Bowling

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about where you are based, your background experience how you first started inventing?

Matt: I’m living in Dayton, Ohio attending a school called the Air Force Institute of Technology. Dayton is a hub for innovation and is where the Wright Brother’s started flying their airplane.  As for me, this is my first invention. I have another one in prototype status and I’m researching the intellectual property perspective of the game.

Tara: Please could you tell me a little bit about Rollors, what it is and how you came up with the idea?

Matt: I created the new award winning game called Rollors. Think of Rollors as a game that combines the fun of Bocce Ball, Horseshoes, and Bowling. There are both the elements of skill and chance to Rollors. The homepage for the game is www.rollors.net

Tara: What were the first steps you took after having your idea?

Matt: Researching if there was already an idea like Rollors in the public domain. I did that by researching what was on the shelves of stores, searching the Internet and using the various patent search sites online.

Rollors Game invention

Tara: Did you try and patent or protect your idea in any way and how did you go about it?

Matt: Yes. I have one utility patent that’s been approved and a couple more pending (one of which is international). After I completed the step above I looked up local patent attorneys and read a couple books on patents.

Tara: Did you get presentation drawing sheets produced or make a prototype of Rollors?

Matt: Yes. I used the drawing sheets from my first patent for the drawing sheets. Another thing I did I would recommend is research any local schools that might have any type of CAD classes or prototyping machines.

Tara: Have you licensed Rollors to a toy company or are you manufacturing and selling it yourself, and why?

Matt: Yes, I’ve licensed the game to another game company in the US. I did it so they could bring Rollors to a new level that I wasn’t able to do since I have another job. I’m now searching for international distribution and/or licensing opportunities for Rollors.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SKMieatidwA&feature=plcp

Tara: What have you found are the most successful ways of promoting Rollors?

Matt: I would say persistence, persistence, and more persistence. What keep my persistence going is getting great feedback and testimonials from people about their Rollors experience. They’ve all been very positive which in turn feeds the fire for my persistence.

Tara: What were the most difficult elements of bringing Rollors to market?

Matt: The most difficult part is spreading the word about the game. I’m always thinking up new innovative ways via blogs, gift guides, review sites, press releases, social media, etc.

Tara: How long has it taken from your initial idea to taking it to market?

Matt: The idea started to “roll” around in my head back in 2008 but I did a lot of researching into how I can keep my game protected through patent protection. When the first patent filed then I could start developing the website and spreading the word about the game.

Rollors Toy Invention

Tara: Is there anything you learned developing Rollors that you would now do differently if you had to do it all again?

Matt: Yes. This may sound like a minor thing but I think every tidbit of information that is shared with future inventors helps them so they don’t recreate the same thing (if it’s negative). When I first started out I had custom letterhead and envelopes created with the Rollors graphic on it with my mailing address. Since I’m in the military I move around more than the usually person so that was not money well spent.

Tara: What advice would you give any aspiring inventor with an idea?

Use the all the very valuable resources that are out there like the inventors websites, blogs, listen radio shows like Got Invention radio or magazines like Inventors Digest.

Tara: Where can people find out more about you and your game Rollors?

Matt:
FB:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Rollors/254952007893704
Twitter: 
http://twitter.com/#!/rollors
Website:
www.rollors.net

Are you an inventor or invention expert with an interesting story or advice to share? Please get in touch via the contact form or email tara (at) ideasuploaded (dot) com